Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account


#ActualÁlvaro

Posted 21 November 2012 - 07:32 AM

I guess it might be a matter of adjusting parameters correctly. The parametrization used in that code is a bit strange to me, but you essentially have a differential equation that looks like a damped harmonic oscillator:

force = -k * (position - target_position) - c * velocity

You'll then compute acceleration as force/mass. The damping ratio is defined as c/(2*sqrt(m*k)). If your damping ratio is under 1, you'll have oscillations. You should aim for a damping ratio of 1 or just a little above. As usual, experimentation is the only way to tell what feels right in your situation.

Of course you can cap the magnitude of the force to some maximum value.

#1Álvaro

Posted 21 November 2012 - 07:31 AM

I guess it might be a matter of adjusting parameters correctly. The parametrization used in that code is a bit strange to me, but you essentially have a differential equation that looks like a damped harmonic oscillator:

force = -k * (position - target_position) - c * velocity

You'll then compute acceleration as force/mass. The damping ratio is defined as c/(2*sqrt(m*k)). If your damping ratio is under 1, you'll have oscillations. You should aim for a damping ratio of 1 or just a little above. But of course, experimentation is the only way to tell what feels right in your situation.


Of course you can cap the magnitude of the force to some maximum value.

PARTNERS