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#ActualBacterius

Posted 22 November 2012 - 12:57 AM

Well obviously if you are the one doing the art, things are different, but the majority of developers cannot produce good artwork (we do "programmer art" instead, i.e. 16x16 sprites that look like a six year old child just discovered MS Paint), and it's better to use that as a placeholder first than to go hunt for/purchase artwork for your game first, because:
- a functional game with crappy art constitutes more satisfactory and tangible progress (to the developer) than a nonfunctional game with beautiful art
- the sprites you choose at first will probably be heavily redesigned throughout the game as you polish the gameplay

It's the same reason why people don't decide on a definitive game name before even starting it - you go with a codename used to refer to "the project", and the actual decision of what to call the release comes in the final stages (and you may even end up actually using the original name - it sometimes is the case, but not always)

#4Bacterius

Posted 22 November 2012 - 12:55 AM

Well obviously if you are the one doing the art, things are different, but the majority of developers cannot produce good artwork (we do "programmer art" instead, i.e. 16x16 sprites that look like a six year old child just discovered MS Paint), and it's better to use that as a placeholder first than to go hunt for/purchase artwork for your game first, because:
- a functional game with crappy art constitutes more satisfactory and tangible progress (to the developer) than a nonfunctional game with beautiful art
- the sprites you choose at first will probably be heavily redesigned throughout the game as you polish the gameplay

It's the same reason why people don't decide on a definitive game name before even starting it - you go with a codename used to refer to "the project", and the actual decision of what to call the release comes in the final stages (and may be the same - it often is, but not always)

#3Bacterius

Posted 22 November 2012 - 12:54 AM

Well obviously if you are the one doing the art, things are different, but the majority of developers cannot produce good artwork (we do "programmer art" instead, i.e. 16x16 sprites that look like a six year old child just discovered MS Paint), and it's better to use that as a placeholder first than to go hunt for/purchase artwork for your game first, because:
- a functional game with crappy art constitutes more satisfactory and tangible progress (to the developer) than a nonfunctional game with beautiful art
- the sprites you choose at first will probably be heavily redesigned throughout the game as you polish the gameplay

It's the same reason why people don't decide on a definitive game name before even starting it - you go with a codename used to refer to "the project", and the actual decision of what to call the release comes in the final stages.

#2Bacterius

Posted 22 November 2012 - 12:52 AM

Well obviously if you are the one doing the art, things are different, but the majority of developers cannot produce good artwork (we do "programmer art" instead, i.e. 16x16 sprites that look like a six year old child just discovered MS Paint), and it's better to use that as a placeholder first than to go hunt for/purchase artwork for your game first, because:
- a functional game with crappy art constitutes more satisfactory progress than a nonfunctional game with beautiful art
- the sprites you choose at first will probably be heavily redesigned throughout the game as you polish the gameplay

It's the same reason why people don't decide on a definitive game name before even starting it - you go with a codename used to refer to "the project", and the actual decision of what to call the release comes in the final stages.

#1Bacterius

Posted 22 November 2012 - 12:52 AM

Well obviously if you are the one doing the art, things are different, but the majority of developers cannot produce good artwork (we do "programmer art" instead, i.e. 16x16 sprites that look like a six year old discovering MS Paint), and it's better to use that as a placeholder first than to go hunt for/purchase artwork for your game first, because:
- a functional game with crappy art constitutes more satisfactory progress than a nonfunctional game with beautiful art
- the sprites you choose at first will probably be heavily redesigned throughout the game as you polish the gameplay

It's the same reason why people don't decide on a definitive game name before even starting it - you go with a codename used to refer to "the project", and the actual decision of what to call the release comes in the final stages.

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