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#ActualEdy

Posted 23 November 2012 - 11:43 AM

I believe that suspension geometries go far beyond "where this force applies". As far as I can figure out, all forces act on the rigid body at the point they are applied (C in this case, with respect to CG). However, the "intermediate path" and its consequences (i.e. suspension, roll center, etc.) are not easy to calculate. I think it's something related with solving inverse kinematics, unless you are using a physics engine allowing "hard" joints and constraints. In this case you would just apply the force to the wheel's attachment point and the engine would properly propagate it to the rigid body. Again, these are my thoughts, I have no real experience with this.

#3Edy

Posted 23 November 2012 - 11:43 AM

I believe that suspension geometries go far beyond "where this force applies". As far as I can figure out, all forces act on the rigid body at the point they are applied (C in this case, with respect to CG). However, the "intermediate path" and its consequences (i.e. suspension, roll center, etc.) are not easy to calculate. I think it's something related with solving inverse kinematics, unless you are using a physics engine allowing "hard" joints and constraints. In this case you would just apply the force to the wheel's attachment point and the engine would properly propagate it to the rigid body. Again, these are my thoughts, I have no real experience with this.

#2Edy

Posted 23 November 2012 - 11:43 AM

I believe that suspension geometries go far beyond "where this force applies". As far as I can figure out, all forces act on the rigid body at the point they are applied (C in this case, with regards with CG). However, the "intermediate path" and its consequences (i.e. suspension, roll center, etc.) are not easy to calculate. I think it's something related with solving inverse kinematics, unless you are using a physics engine allowing "hard" joints and constraints. In this case you would just apply the force to the wheel's attachment point and the engine would properly propagate it to the rigid body. Again, these are my thoughts, I have no real experience with this.

#1Edy

Posted 23 November 2012 - 11:42 AM

I believe that suspension geometries go far beyond "where this force applies". As far as I can figure out, all forces act on the rigid body at the point they are applied (C in this case). However, the "intermediate path" and its consequences (i.e. suspension, roll center, etc.) are not easy to calculate. I think it's something related with solving inverse kinematics, unless you are using a physics engine allowing "hard" joints and constraints. In this case you would just apply the force to the wheel's attachment point and the engine would properly propagate it to the rigid body. Again, these are my thoughts, I have no real experience with this.

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