Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

#ActualL. Spiro

Posted 25 November 2012 - 09:43 PM

Contrary to popular belief there are very cheap places here in Japan, even if you are in a big city such as Tokyo.
Other big cities such as Osaka are literally half the price of Tokyo.

So in Osaka you could get 25 square meters for about $400 per month, and that is inside the city. If you are willing to live a bit of a way from the station you could get the same for $220 or so.

My room in Thailand was the same size and only $80 or so per month (and it was very clean and modern), but since you want fast Internet I can’t recommend Thailand.
I would stick with the cleanest and most modernized country in the world (Japan), which also provides the fastest Internet (the country average is only #2 in the world, but that is only because of old people (Japan has the longest life expectancy of any country), which is far less common in South Korea—the actual average when considering only the people who are relevant makes Japan #1 by a very huge margin—here is my home connection (just $30 per month): Posted Image (South Korea may be #1 on average, but this connection speed is hard to find there, yet very easy to find in Japan)).


Also your paycheck won’t be like in Thailand or India (as mentioned by frob). For game programming I think you won’t find anything below $65,000 per year, and if you do then it’s your own fault. It’s easy to find jobs closer to the $90,000 mark.

And contrary to popular belief you won’t be working 12-hour days etc., at least if you are programming games. Yes, that is common in Japan, but not so much inside the game industry. You hear about those people a lot but they are working in other types of programming such as finance or general-use software.
I have never had to work overtime here except on 2 days when the deadline was close and a new bug was just found. Otherwise, for example now, I work 7 hours and have 1 hour for lunch, and then go home. It’s normal.


If you still aren’t convinced, I have 2 words that nobody can resist: 塩ラーメン.


L. Spiro

#3L. Spiro

Posted 25 November 2012 - 09:43 PM

Contrary to popular belief there are very cheap places here in Japan, even if you are in a big city such as Tokyo.
Other big cities such as Osaka are literally half the price of Tokyo.

So in Osaka you could get 25 square meters for about $400 per month, and that is inside the city. If you are willing to live a bit of a way from the station you could get the same for $220 or so.

My room in Thailand was the same size and only $80 or so per month (and it was very clean and modern), but since you want fast Internet I can’t recommend Thailand.
I would stick with the cleanest and most modernized country in the world (Japan), which also provides the fastest Internet (the country average is only #2 in the world, but that is only because of old people (Japan has the longest life expectancy of any country), which is far less common in South Korea—the actual average when considering only the people who are relevant makes Japan #1 by a very huge margin—here is my home connection ($30 per month): Posted Image (South Korea may be #1 on average, but this connection speed is hard to find there, yet very easy to find in Japan)).


Also your paycheck won’t be like in Thailand or India (as mentioned by frob). For game programming I think you won’t find anything below $65,000 per year, and if you do then it’s your own fault. It’s easy to find jobs closer to the $90,000 mark.

And contrary to popular belief you won’t be working 12-hour days etc., at least if you are programming games. Yes, that is common in Japan, but not so much inside the game industry. You hear about those people a lot but they are working in other types of programming such as finance or general-use software.
I have never had to work overtime here except on 2 days when the deadline was close and a new bug was just found. Otherwise, for example now, I work 7 hours and have 1 hour for lunch, and then go home. It’s normal.


If you still aren’t convinced, I have 2 words that nobody can resist: 塩ラーメン.


L. Spiro

#2L. Spiro

Posted 25 November 2012 - 09:42 PM

Contrary to popular belief there are very cheap places here in Japan, even if you are in a big city such as Tokyo.
Other big cities such as Osaka are literally half the price of Tokyo.

So in Osaka you could get 25 square meters for about $400 per month, and that is inside the city. If you are willing to live a bit of a way from the station you could get the same for $220 or so.

My room in Thailand was the same size and only $80 or so per month (and it was very clean and modern), but since you want fast Internet I can’t recommend Thailand.
I would stick with the cleanest and most modernized country in the world (Japan), which also provides the fastest Internet (the country average is only #2 in the world, but that is only because of old people (Japan has the longest life expectancy of any country), which is far less common in South Korea—the actual average when considering only the people who are relevant makes Japan #1 by a very huge margin—here is my home connection: Posted Image (South Korea may be #1 on average, but this connection speed is hard to find there, yet very easy to find in Japan)).


Also your paycheck won’t be like in Thailand or India (as mentioned by frob). For game programming I think you won’t find anything below $65,000 per year, and if you do then it’s your own fault. It’s easy to find jobs closer to the $90,000 mark.

And contrary to popular belief you won’t be working 12-hour days etc., at least if you are programming games. Yes, that is common in Japan, but not so much inside the game industry. You hear about those people a lot but they are working in other types of programming such as finance or general-use software.
I have never had to work overtime here except on 2 days when the deadline was close and a new bug was just found. Otherwise, for example now, I work 7 hours and have 1 hour for lunch, and then go home. It’s normal.


If you still aren’t convinced, I have 2 words that nobody can resist: 塩ラーメン.


L. Spiro

#1L. Spiro

Posted 25 November 2012 - 09:42 PM

Contrary to popular belief there are very cheap places here in Japan, even if you are in a big city such as Tokyo.
Other big cities such as Osaka are literally half the price of Tokyo.

So in Osaka you could get 25 square meters for about $400 per month, and that is inside the city. If you are willing to live a bit of a way from the station you could get the same for $220 or so.

My room in Thailand was the same size and only $80 or so per month (and it was very clean and modern), but since you want fast Internet I can’t recommend Thailand.
I would stick with the cleanest and most modernized country in the world (Japan), which also provides the fastest Internet (the country average is only #2 in the world, but that is only because of old people (Japan has the longest life expectancy of any country), which is far less common in South Korea—the actual average when considering only the people who are relevant makes Japan #1 by a very huge margin—here is my home connection: Posted Image (South Korea may be #1 on average, but this connection speed is hard to find there, yet very easy to find in Japan)).


Also your paycheck won’t be like in Thailand or India (as mentioned by frob). For game programming I think you won’t find anything below $65,000 per year, and if you do then it’s your own fault. It’s easy to find jobs closer to the $90,000 mark.

And contrary to popular belief you won’t be working 12-hour days etc., at least if you are programming games. Yes, that is common in Japan, but not so much inside the game industry. You hear about those people a lot but they are working in other types of programming such as finance or general-use software.
I have never had to work overtime here except on 2 days when the deadline was close and a new bug was just found. Otherwise, for example now, I work 7 hours and have 1 hour for lunch, and then go home. It’s normal.


If you still aren’t convinced, I have 2 words that nobody can resist: 塩ラーメン.


L. Spiro

PARTNERS