Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account


#ActualBitMaster

Posted 26 November 2012 - 04:26 AM

There are two ways to go at this within the SNES-constraints.
1) Create a lot of pretransformed versions of your sprite. So for example <sprite>_frontal_distance0, <sprite>_frontal_distance1, ..., <sprite>_left_distance0, <sprite>_left_distance1, ..., <sprite>_right_distance0, <sprite>_right_distance1. Then you just have to blit the right sprites in.
Advantages: can take the non-planar nature of the sprites into account if the sprites are prerendered instead of just pretransformed.
Disadvantage: you will need a lot of space for each sprite; need to write/find/buy a tool to automate the sprite creation or it is a real lot of work.
2) Have one sprite and do a perspective projection on the fly (just a simple blit from a 2d rectangle to a 2d trapezoid). I'm unfamiliar with the exact capabilities of the SNES but I remember it had a lot of fancy 2d blitting implemented in hardware, if it can do something like that you get a (very) reduced version of modern 3d graphics.
Advantages: does not require extra work doing asset creation.
Disadvantages: might not look very good; math to be implemented probably requires a decent understanding of how 3d graphics work.

#3BitMaster

Posted 26 November 2012 - 04:26 AM

There are two ways to go at this within the SNES-constraints.
1) Create a lot of pretransformed versions of your sprite. So for example <sprite>_frontal_distance0, <sprite>_frontal_distance1, ..., <sprite>_left_distance0, <sprite>_left_distance1, ..., <sprite>_right_distance0, <sprite>_right_distance1. Then you just have to blit the right sprites in.
Advantages: can take the non-planar nature of the sprites into account if the sprites are prerendered instead of just pretransformed.
Disadvantage: you will need a lot of space for each sprite; need to write/find/buy a tool to automate the sprite creation or it is a real lot of work.
2) Have one sprite and do a perspective projection on the fly (just a simple blit from a 2d rectangle to a 2d trapezoid). I'm unfamiliar with the exact capabilities of the SNES but I remember it had a lot of fancy 2d blitting implemented in hardware, if it can do something like that you get a (very) reduced version of modern 3d graphics.
Advantages: does not require extra work doing asset creation.
Disadvantages: might not look very good; math to be implemented probably requires a decent understanding of how 3d graphics work.

#2BitMaster

Posted 26 November 2012 - 04:26 AM

There are two ways to go at this within the SNES-constraints.
1) Create a lot of pretransformed versions of your sprite. So for example <sprite>_frontal_distance0, <sprite>_frontal_distance1, ..., <sprite>_left_distance0, <sprite>_left_distance1, ..., <sprite>_right_distance0, <sprite>_right_distance1. Then you just have to blit the right sprites in.
Advantages: can take the non-planar nature of the sprites into account if the sprites are prerendered instead of just pretransformed.
Disadvantage: you will need a lot of space for each sprite; need to write/find/buy a tool to automate the sprite creation or it is a real lot of work.
2) Have one sprite and do a perspective projection on the fly (just a simple blit from a 2d rectangle to a 2d trapezoid). I'm unfamiliar with the exact capabilities of the SNES but I remember it had a lot of fancy 2d blitting implemented in hardware, if it can do something like that you get a (very) reduced version of modern 3d graphics.
Advantages: does not require extra work doing asset creation.
Disadvantages: might not look very good; math to be implemented probably requires a decent understanding of how 3d graphics work.

#1BitMaster

Posted 26 November 2012 - 04:25 AM

There are two ways to go at this.
1) Create a lot of pretransformed versions of your sprite. So for example <sprite>_frontal_distance0, <sprite>_frontal_distance1, ..., <sprite>_left_distance0, <sprite>_left_distance1, ..., <sprite>_right_distance0, <sprite>_right_distance1. Then you just have to blit the right sprites in.
Advantages: can take the non-planar nature of the sprites into account if the sprites are prerendered instead of just pretransformed.
Disadvantage: you will need a lot of space for each sprite; need to write/find/buy a tool to automate the sprite creation or it is a real lot of work.
2) Have one sprite and do a perspective projection on the fly (just a simple blit from a 2d rectangle to a 2d trapezoid). I'm unfamiliar with the exact capabilities of the SNES but I remember it had a lot of fancy 2d blitting implemented in hardware, if it can do something like that you get a (very) reduced version of modern 3d graphics.
Advantages: does not require extra work doing asset creation.
Disadvantages: might not look very good; math to be implemented probably requires a decent understanding of how 3d graphics work.

PARTNERS