Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account


#ActualPwFClockWise

Posted 30 November 2012 - 04:41 AM

Hi there, I read your entire post and I will give you some of my thoughts. It's important for you to understand that I have no working experience and in programming skills I would place myself at your level - but with C++ and 3D programming. Java and its market is beyond my experience, except for a few small projects in freshman year of my 5 year long education(I'm currently 3 ½ year in).

A few weeks ago we had field trips to some game studios. Like...big ones, who have done work on Farcry 3 and Assassin's Creed. Both these studios said that grades are pretty much useless when it comes looking for work. They don't care. They don't care what you SAY you can do. They care about what you've already done and can show them. This is the only thing they are looking for. I can imagine that the java market might be a bit more flexible when it comes to this since games for smartphones and browsers and whatnot have pretty much exploded these last few years. I still think that your portfolio will be the most important tool you can have when applying for work.

That said, I think you should try to make different kinds of projects - from start to end. Unfinished work is not of use to anyone. Make an app, it can be pretty much anything. It doesn't have to be super unique you only want to show off your skills. And your indie game? That is a great idea, with one flaw; Don't aim to make money off of it. Relying on making money of your indie game when you have no marketing skills( I assume) and none to assist with graphics is too much of a long shot, in my opinion. However, making a playable, interesting game that actually works will be an incredible addition to your portfolio -it will also be a lot of fun.

Another thing I've noticed is that a lot of studios are using, at least when it comes to games, a development method called SCRUM or KANBAN. In fact, a lot of game studios demands that you have read a course in either of them. Not sure how it is in the java world or outside my own country, to be honest. I really think you should look into it, at least read up on it on wikipedia if you don't already know what it's about.

To sum it up: Make projects from start to finish. No matter what kind of projects they are, working projects are always good to present. Try to make a few different projects, like an indie game, an app(maybe for your indie game even) and something else. I'm not really familiar what can be done in java since I only use C++. Build your portfolio, it's a great way to start.

Hopefully I was of assistance and if you need someone to help you with ideas for games or apps or w/e feel free to pm me. And, again, I haven't seen the outside world yet, I'm still in college so I haven't yet applied for work, but every teacher and every developer I know says that grades are useless and that every employer wants to see what you've actually done.

Good luck!

#4PwFClockWise

Posted 30 November 2012 - 03:21 AM

Hi there, I read your entire post and I will give you some of my thoughts. It's important for you to understand that I have no working experience and in programming skills I would place myself at your level - but with C++ and 3D programming. Java and its market is beyond my experience, except for a few small projects in freshman year of my 5 year long education(I'm currently 3 ½ year in).

A few weeks ago we had field trips to some game studios. Like...big ones, who have done work on Farcry 3 and Assassin's Creed. Both these studios said that grades are pretty much useless when it comes looking for work. They don't care. They don't care what you SAY you can do. They care about what you've already done and can show them. This is the only thing they are looking for. I can imagine that the java market might be a bit more flexible when it comes to this since games for smartphones and browsers and whatnot have pretty much exploded these last few years. I still think that your portfolio will be the most important tool you can have when applying for work.

That said, I think you should try to make different kinds of projects - from start to end. Unfinished work is not of use to anyone. Make an app, it can be pretty much anything. It doesn't have to be super unique you only want to show off your skills. And your indie game? That is a great idea, with one flaw; Don't aim to make money off of it. Relying on making money of your indie game when you have no marketing skills( I assume) and none to assist with graphics is too much of a long shot, in my opinion. However, making a playable, interesting game that actually works will be an incredible addition to your portfolio -it will also be a lot of fun.

Another thing I've noticed is that a lot of studios are using, at least when it comes to games, a development method called SCRUM or KANBAN. In fact, a lot of game studios demands that you have read a course in either of them. Not sure how it is in the java world or outside my own country, to be honest. I really think you should look into it, at least read up on it on wikipedia if you don't already know what it's about.

To sum it up: Make projects from start to finish. No matter what kind of projects they are, working projects are always good to present. Try to make a few different projects, like an indie game, an app(maybe for your indie game even) and something else. I'm not really familiar what can be done in java since I only use C++. Build your portfolio, it's a great way to start.

Hopefully I was of assistance and if you need someone to help you with ideas for games or apps or w/e feel free to pm me. And, again, I haven't seen the outside world yet, I'm still in college so I haven't yet applied for work, but every teacher and every developer I know says that grades are useless and that every employer wants to see what you've actually done.

Good luck!

#3PwFClockWise

Posted 30 November 2012 - 03:19 AM

Hi there, I read your entire post and I will give you some of my thoughts. It's important for you to understand that I have no working experience and in programming skills I would place myself at your level - but with C++ and 3D programming. Java and its market is beyond my experience, except for a few small projects in freshman year of my 5 year long education(I'm currently 3 ½ year in).

A few weeks ago we had field trips to some game studios. Like...big ones, who have done work on Farcry 3 and Assassin's Creed. Both these studios said that grades are pretty much useless when it comes looking for work. They don't care. They don't care what you SAY you can do. They care about what you've already done and can show them. This is the only thing they are looking for. I can imagine that the java market might be a bit more flexible when it comes to this since games for smartphones and browsers and whatnot have pretty much exploded these last few years. I still think that your portfolio will be the most important tool you can have when applying for work.

That said, I think you should try to make different kinds of projects - from start to end. Unfinished work is not of use to anyone. Make an app, it can be pretty much anything. It doesn't have to be super unique you only want to show off your skills. And your indie game? That is a great idea, with one flaw; Don't aim to make money off of it. Relying on making money of your indie game when you have no marketing skills( I assume) and none to assist with graphics is too much of a long shot, in my opinion. However, making a playable, interesting game that actually works will be an incredible addition to your portfolio -it will also be a lot of fun.

Another thing I've noticed a lot of studios are using, at least when it comes to games, is to use a development method called SCRUM or KANBAN. In fact, a lot of game studios demands that you have read a course in either of them. Not sure how it is in the java world or outside my own country, to be honest. I really think you should look into it, at least read up on it on wikipedia if you don't already know what it's about.

To sum it up: Make projects from start to finish. No matter what kind of projects they are, working projects are always good to present. Try to make a few different projects, like an indie game, an app(maybe for your indie game even) and something else. I'm not really familiar what can be done in java since I only use C++. Build your portfolio, it's a great way to start.

Hopefully I was of assistance and if you need someone to help you with ideas for games or apps or w/e feel free to pm me. And, again, I haven't seen the outside world yet, I'm still in college so I'm haven't yet applied for work, but every teacher and every developer I know says that grades are useless and that every employer wants to see what you've actually done.

Good luck!

#2PwFClockWise

Posted 30 November 2012 - 03:19 AM

Hi there, I read your entire post and I will give you some of my thoughts. It's important for you to understand that I have no working experience and in programming skills I would place myself at your level - but with C++ and 3D programming. Java and its market is beyond my experience, except for a few small projects in freshman year of my 5 year long education(I'm currently 3 ½ year in).

A few weeks ago we had field trips to some game studios. Like...big ones, who have done work on Farcry 3 and Assassin's Creed. Both these studios said that grades are pretty much useless when it comes looking for work. They don't care. They don't care what you SAY you can do. They care about what you've already done and can show them. This is the only thing they are looking for. I can imagine that the java market might be a bit more flexible when it comes to this since games for smartphones and browsers and whatnot have pretty much exploded these last few years. I still think that your portfolio will be the most important tool you can have when applying for work.

That said, I think you should try to make different kinds of projects - from start to end. Unfinished work is not of use to anyone. Make an app, it can be pretty much anything. It doesn't have to be super unique you only want to show off your skills. And your indie game? That is a great idea, with one flaw; Don't aim to make money off of it. Relying on making money of your indie game when you have no marketing skills( I assume) and none to assist with graphics is too much of a long shot, in my opinion. However, making a playable, interesting game that actually works will be an incredible addition to your portfoli -it will also be a lot of fun.

Another thing I've noticed a lot of studios are using, at least when it comes to games, is to use a development method called SCRUM or KANBAN. In fact, a lot of game studios demands that you have read a course in either of them. Not sure how it is in the java world or outside my own country, to be honest. I really think you should look into it, at least read up on it on wikipedia if you don't already know what it's about.

To sum it up: Make projects from start to finish. No matter what kind of projects they are, working projects are always good to present. Try to make a few different projects, like an indie game, an app(maybe for your indie game even) and something else. I'm not really familiar what can be done in java since I only use C++. Build your portfolio, it's a great way to start.

Hopefully I was of assistance and if you need someone to help you with ideas for games or apps or w/e feel free to pm me. And, again, I haven't seen the outside world yet, I'm still in college so I'm haven't yet applied for work, but every teacher and every developer I know says that grades are useless and that every employer wants to see what you've actually done.

Good luck!

#1PwFClockWise

Posted 30 November 2012 - 03:17 AM

Hi there, I read your entire post and I will give you some of my thoughts. It's important for you to understand that I have no working experience and in programming skills I would place myself at your level - but with C++ and 3D programming. Java and its market is beyond my experience, except for a few small projects in freshman year of my 5 year long education(I'm currently 3 ½ year in).

A few weeks ago we had field trips to some game studios. Like...big ones, who have done work on Farcry 3 and Assassin's Creed. Both these studios said that grades are pretty much useless when it comes looking for work. They don't care. They don't care what you SAY you can do. They care about what you've already done and can show them. This is the only thing they are looking for. I can imagine that the java market might be a bit more flexible when it comes to this since games for smartphones and browsers and whatnot have pretty much exploded these last few years. I still think that your portfolio will be the most important tool you can have when applying for work.

That said, I think you should try to make different kinds of projects - from start to end. Unfinished work is not of use to anyone. Make an app, it can be pretty much anything. It doesn't have to be super unique you only want to show off your skills. And your indie game? That is a great idea, with one flaw; Don't aim to make money off of it. Relying on making money of your indie game when you have no marketing skills( I assume) and none to assist with graphics is too much of a long shot, in my opinion. However, making a playable, interesting game that actually works will be an incredible addition to your portfolio. It will also be a lot of fun.

Another thing I've noticed a lot of studios are using, at least when it comes to games, is to use a development method called SCRUM or KANBAN. In fact, a lot of game studios demands that you have read a course in either of them. Not sure how it is in the java world or outside my own country, to be honest. I really think you should look into it, at least read up on it on wikipedia if you don't already know what it's about.

To sum it up: Make projects from start to finish. No matter what kind of projects they are, working projects are always good to present. Try to make a few different projects, like an indie game, an app(maybe for your indie game even) and something else. I'm not really familiar what can be done in java since I only use C++. Build your portfolio, it's a great way to start.

Hopefully I was of assistance and if you need someone to help you with ideas for games or apps or w/e feel free to pm me. And, again, I haven't seen the outside world yet, I'm still in college so I'm haven't yet applied for work, but every teacher and every developer I know says that grades are useless and that every employer wants to see what you've actually done.

Good luck!

PARTNERS