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#ActualStarnick

Posted 02 December 2012 - 09:18 AM

I've bought - and played - at least two XNA games commercially via steam (Terraria and Magicka...Magicka being one that looks more like a "real commercial" game in quality, as well as new content). Probably a few others, especially since the "steam green lighting" system is getting more and more indie games onto the distribution platform.

I'm sure if there is no XNA sequel (or any official C#/.NET graphics binding from Microsoft), eventually more and more folks will be using something more up to date like SharpDX and it will be true that you won't see anyone using XNA commercially . But that's exactly what it is too...a means to do the graphics. Xna has some extra incentivies that makes it nice to use for game making, but at the end of the day most of that work is done (at least, the quality ones) through your efforts, sweat, and blood (or tears).

#2Starnick

Posted 02 December 2012 - 09:18 AM

I've bought - and played - at least two XNA games commercially via steam (Terraria and Magicka...Magicka being one that looks more like a "real commercial" game in quality, as well as new content). Probably a few others, especially since the "steam green lighting" system is getting more and more indie games onto the distribution platform.

I'm sure if there is no XNA sequel (or any official C#/.NET graphics binding from Microsoft), eventually more and more folks will be using something more up to date like SharpDX and it will be true that you won't see anyone using XNA commercially . But that's exactly what it is too...a means to do the graphics. Xna has some extra incentivies that makes it nice to use for game making, but at the end of the day most of that is done (at least, the quality ones) through your efforts, sweat, and blood (or tears).

#1Starnick

Posted 02 December 2012 - 09:18 AM

I've bought - and played - at least two XNA games commercially via steam (Terraria and Magicka...Magicka being one that looks more like a "real commercial" game in quality, as well as new content). Probably a few others, especially since the "steam green lighting" system is getting more and more indie games onto the distribution platform.

I'm sure if there is no XNA sequel (or any official C#/.NET graphics binding from Microsoft), eventually more and more folks will be using something more up to date like SharpDX . But that's exactly what it is too...a means to do the graphics. Xna has some extra incentivies that makes it nice to use for game making, but at the end of the day most of that is done (at least, the quality ones) through your efforts, sweat, and blood (or tears).

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