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#ActualBacterius

Posted 02 December 2012 - 04:15 PM

From what I understand, near and far represent values that relate to camera space, not clip space.

If you use something like 0 and 100 for n and f respectively, you should be able to see geometry where incoming vertex z is negative.

The near-plane value should never be zero, or you will lose an immense amount of precision (remember the depth buffer uses a logarithmic scale). The best values depend on the scale of the scene, but if you're working in meters, 0.1 to 1000 is a good start IMHO.

#2Bacterius

Posted 02 December 2012 - 04:15 PM

From what I understand, near and far represent values that relate to camera space, not clip space.

If you use something like 0 and 100 for n and f respectively, you should be able to see geometry where incoming vertex z is negative.

The near-plane value should never be zero or negative, or you will lose an immense amount of precision (remember the depth buffer uses a logarithmic scale). The best values depend on the scale of the scene, but if you're working in meters, 0.1 to 1000 is a good start IMHO.

#1Bacterius

Posted 02 December 2012 - 04:15 PM

From what I understand, near and far represent values that relate to camera space, not clip space.

The near-plane value should never be zero or negative, or you will lose an immense amount of precision (remember the depth buffer uses a logarithmic scale). The best values depend on the scale of the scene, but if you're working in meters, 0.1 to 1000 is a good start IMHO.

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