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#Actualrip-off

Posted 04 December 2012 - 03:31 AM

Two things I picked up on from Superman and rip-off; the trailing '_' after variables and using 'k' in Enumerated types is something I have been following from the Google Style guide on C++. I wanted to find a way of making my code consistent. If it seems wrong, then I will look into changing that for my next project.

These are stylistic things, so they aren't "wrong" necessarily. I use the trailing underscores myself in some projects. The "k" prefix is one I haven't seen. But if you think it makes sense for you, that is OK.

Given that C++ places the enum names in the enclosing scope, I prefer to prefix the enum names with some "tag" that groups them, e.g.
enum Direction {
	DirectionNone,
	DirectionUp,
	DirectionDown
	// ...
};

// Later
Direction direction = DirectionUp;
Some might find duplicating the name of the enumeration like this distasteful, and I can't say they are wrong.

Some people prefer to place global enums inside a namespace instead:
namespace Direction {
	enum Type {
		None,
		Up,
		Down
		// ...
	};
}

// Later
Direction::Type direction = Direction::Up;
However IMO now your declaration syntax starts getting quite funky.

There isn't a definitive answer, but it is good to think about these things and not just blindly applying them.

#2rip-off

Posted 03 December 2012 - 06:29 PM

Two things I picked up on from Superman and rip-off; the trailing '_' after variables and using 'k' in Enumerated types is something I have been following from the Google Style guide on C++. I wanted to find a way of making my code consistent. If it seems wrong, then I will look into changing that for my next project.

These are stylistic things, so they aren't "wrong" necessarily. I use the trailing underscores myself in some projects. The "k" prefix is one I haven't seen. But if you think it makes sense for you, that is OK.

Given that C++ places the enum names in the enclosing scope, I prefer to prefix the enum names with some "tag" that groups them, e.g.
enum Direction { 
    DirectionNone,
    DirectionUp,
    DirectionDown
    // ...
};

// Later
Direction direction = DirectionUp;
[code]
Some might find duplicating the name of the enumeration like this distasteful, and I can't say they are wrong.

Some people prefer to place global enums inside a namespace instead:
[code]
namespace Direction { 
    enum Type { 
        None, 
        Up, 
        Down
        // ...
    };
}

// Later
Direction::Type direction = Direction::Up;
However IMO now your declaration syntax starts getting quite funky.

There isn't a definitive answer, but it is good to think about these things and not just blindly applying them.

#1rip-off

Posted 03 December 2012 - 06:18 PM

Two things I picked up on from Superman and rip-off; the trailing '_' after variables and using 'k' in Enumerated types is something I have been following from the Google Style guide on C++. I wanted to find a way of making my code consistent. If it seems wrong, then I will look into changing that for my next project.

These are stylistic things, so they aren't "wrong" necessarily. I use the trailing underscores myself in some projects. The "k" prefix is one I haven't seen. But if you think it makes sense for you, that is OK.

Given that C++ places the enum names in the enclosing scope, I prefer to prefix the enum names with some "tag" that groups them, e.g. enum Direction { DirectionNone, DirectionUp, DirectionDown }

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