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#ActualSuperVGA

Posted 04 December 2012 - 01:47 AM

I've worked with Delphi professionally for 1 year, and although the syntax is pretty easy to get used to (having used many languages before then) there were still some things bothering me;
I can't recall why, but I think some cases of nested statements resulted in obscure end if end-for statements, but I learned to live with that.
The Borland (Later Embarcadero) IDEs (Of which I've been using the C++ 2010 version beforehand, but none newer) was a mess to use. It often hung, and all the basic things that you tend to get used to in a good IDE (searching, multiple open files, code completion and referencing) performs slowly and at times behaves unexpectedly.
It bothered me that there were no virtual classes in Delphi (As such, the language is Object Based, not Object Oriented)

On the positive side, the debugger integration in Embarcadero is actually very nice. It's a little slower than debugging in VS,
but our projects were also really big (read: too big). There is a lot of customization you can do to sets of breakpoints, enabling series, detailed conditional switches and such.

Embarcadero's form designer does work rather well (It's better than the one in older versions of VS)

Overall, I agree with Bacterius; If you're doing a Desktop GUI game it's fine.
Maybe even a better choice when you're already used to Pascal or Delphi syntax.

To answer your question: I suggest you continue down this path and make a simple GUI game.
Then make a slick, doublefuffered GDI game and eventually, you can take a look at C++. But get used to programming first, there's nothing for a beginner in C++ can't get from ObjP IMO.

#2SuperVGA

Posted 04 December 2012 - 01:43 AM

I've worked with Delphi professionally for 1 year, and although the syntax is pretty easy to get used to (having used many languages before then) there were still some things bothering me;
I can't recall why, but I think some cases of nested statements resulted in obscure end if end-for statements, but I learned to live with that.
The Borland (Later Embarcadero) IDEs (Of which I've been using the C++ 2010 version beforehand, but none newer) was a mess to use. It often hung, and all the basic things that you tend to get used to in a good IDE (searching, multiple open files, code completion and referencing) performs slowly and at times behaves unexpectedly.
It bothered me that there were no virtual classes in Delphi (As such, the language is Object Based, not Object Oriented)

On the positive side, the debugger integration in Embarcadero is actually very nice. It's a little slower than debugging in VS,
but our projects were also really big (read: too big). There is a lot of customization you can do to sets of breakpoints, enabling series, detailed conditional switches and such.

Embarcadero's form designer does work rather well (It's better than the one in older versions of VS)

Overall, I agree with Bacterius; If you're doing a Desktop GUI game it's fine.
Maybe even a better choice when you're already used to Pascal or Delphi syntax.

To answer your question: I suggest you continue down this path and make a [link url="http://www.mobygames.com/game/dope-wars"]simple GUI game.[/link]
Then make a slick, doublefuffered GDI game and eventually, you can take a look at C++. But get used to programming first, there's nothing for a beginner in C++ can't get from ObjP IMO.

#1SuperVGA

Posted 04 December 2012 - 01:41 AM

I've worked with Delphi professionally for 1 year, and although the syntax is pretty easy to get used to (having used many languages before then) there were still some things bothering me;
I can't recall why, but I think some cases of nested statements resulted in obscure end if end-for statements, but I learned to live with that.
The Borland (Later Embarcadero) IDEs (Of which I've been using the C++ 2010 version beforehand, but none newer) was a mess to use. It often hung, and all the basic things that you tend to get used to in a good IDE (searching, multiple open files, code completion and referencing) performs slowly and at times behaves unexpectedly.
It bothered me that there were no virtual classes in Delphi (As such, the language is Object Based, not Object Oriented)

On the positive side, the debugger integration in Embarcadero is actually very nice. It's a little slower than debugging in VS,
but our projects were also really big (read: too big). There is a lot of customization you can do to sets of breakpoints, enabling series, detailed conditional switches and such.

Embarcadero's form designer does work rather good (It's better than the one in older versions of VS)

Overall, I agree with Bacterius; If you're doing a Desktop GUI game it's fine.
Maybe even a better choice when you're already used to Pascal or Delphi syntax.

To answer your question: I suggest you continue down this path and make a simple gui game.
Then make a slick, doublefuffered GDI game and eventually, you can take a look at C++. But get used to programming first, there's nothing for a beginner in C++ can't get from ObjP IMO.

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