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#Actualnsmadsen

Posted 04 December 2012 - 08:47 AM

Every in-house job I've held was salary. And Hodgeman is exactly right - the job entailed everything audio, from sound design to voice overs to music and implementation. It also included pre-production and production meetings with other depts. I was always required to work mostly on-site but at one company I had a nicer audio set up than they did. Once my boss got to know and trust me he'd often tell me to work from home if we needed a certain style of music that my home rig did better than the office rig. Most companies, at least at the start, will want you on-site. It can also present a licensing issue if employee A is producing company material on their own set up - but not all companies are concerned with this issue.

A trade off to working in-house is that everything you produce on company time and hardware is theirs. Even if they don't use it in the game - they own it. Some companies can be really laid back if you ask for unused cue X (usually the medium to smaller sized ones) but the larger ones can be more of an issue. When you work as a contractor, especially when you're completely off-site, this is less of an issue since you own the hardware/software and most freelancing contracts do not claim to own anything and everything you produce. If they do - either don't sign or charge 50X more than your usual rate!

As far as which is more common - I'd say the later these days. I know more freelancing, off-site composers than I do in-house.

#2nsmadsen

Posted 04 December 2012 - 08:45 AM

Every in-house job I've held was salary. And Hodgeman is exactly right - the job entailed everything audio, from sound design to voice overs to music and implementation. It also included pre-production and production meetings with other depts. I was always required to work mostly on-site but at one company I had a nicer audio set up than they did. Once my boss got to know and trust me he'd often tell me to work from home if we needed a certain style of music that my home rig did better than the office rig.

A trade off to working in-house is that everything you produce on company time and hardware is theirs. Even if they don't use it in the game - they own it. Some companies can be really laid back if you ask for unused cue X (usually the medium to smaller sized ones) but the larger ones can be more of an issue. When you work as a contractor, especially when you're completely off-site, this is less of an issue since you own the hardware/software and most freelancing contracts do not claim to own anything and everything you produce. If they do - either don't sign or charge 50X more than your usual rate!

As far as which is more common - I'd say the later these days. I know more freelancing, off-site composers than I do in-house.

#1nsmadsen

Posted 04 December 2012 - 08:44 AM

Every in-house job I've held was salary. And Hodgeman is exactly right - the job entailed everything audio, from sound design to voice overs to music and implementation. It also included pre-production and production meetings with other depts. I was always required to work mostly on-site but at one company I had a nicer audio set up than they did. Once my boss got to know and trust me he'd often tell me to work from home if we needed a certain style of music that my home rig did better than the office rig.

A trade off to working in-house is that everything you produce on company time and hardware is theirs. Even if they don't use it in the game - they own it. Some companies can be really laid back if you ask for unused cue X (usually the medium to smaller sized ones) but the larger ones can be more of an issue. When you work as a contractor, especially when you're completely off-site, this is less of an issue since you own the hardware/software and most freelancing contracts do not claim to own anything and everything you produce. If they do - either don't sign or charge 50X more than your usual rate!

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