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#ActualKhatharr

Posted 04 December 2012 - 08:31 PM

You could also try working with an "authorware" package that allows you to create your games with little or no programming. A couple of the popular options include Construct 2, Game Maker and RPG Maker, but there are plenty of other options (see this list, and this list amongst others), and despite sometimes being looked down upon these types of packages can -- and have been -- used to produce good quality games that you can sell. Posted Image


This is true. RPG Maker XP got me back into programming after several years of being frustrated and thinking I'd never be able to do it. I learned Ruby there and then moved on to C, C++, Lua, MASM, Java (for about 30 seconds) and now I'm glancing casually at C# with mild distaste. Something like RMXP can give you a pretty good idea of what all is involved in making a fully fledged game, and lets you decide on your own how deep you want to get into it. If you can't stand programming then you don't have to do any - you can just set things up in the menu-driven database. Later, if you want to add functionality to the engine, you can jump into the Ruby script that runs the game and make more or less anything you want. (Seriously, I made a Super Mario game with it once. Not an RPG - straight up Super Mario.)

#1Khatharr

Posted 04 December 2012 - 08:31 PM

You could also try working with an "authorware" package that allows you to create your games with little or no programming. A couple of the popular options include Construct 2, Game Maker and RPG Maker, but there are plenty of other options (see this list, and this list amongst others), and despite sometimes being looked down upon these types of packages can -- and have been -- used to produce good quality games that you can sell. Posted Image


This is true. RPG Maker XP got me back into programming after several years of being frustrated and thinking I'd never be able to do it. I learned Ruby there and then moved on to C, C++, Lua, MASM, Java (for about 30 seconds) and now I'm glancing casually at C# with mild distaste. Something like RMXP can give you a pretty good idea of what all is involved in making a fully fledged game, and lets you decide on your own how deep you want to get into it. If you can't stand programming then you don't have to do any - you can just set things up in the menu-driven database. Later, if you want to add functionality to the engine, you can jump into the Ruby script that runs the game and make more or less anything you want.

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