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#ActualOlof Hedman

Posted 06 December 2012 - 02:52 AM


It's basically inherited from C, which was developed in a time when computers were sufficiently low on memory that they literally couldn't fit all the symbols necessary for a complex program in memory all at the same time and still have room for actual code. Programmers would be able to identify which symbols were really needed and include only those headers.


Thank you, though I should have been more clear in indicating that I do understand the reason, but simply cannot stand the additional handling complexity. Of course it has its raison d'etre even today (embedded systems come to mind), but I might see the language in a more positive light if the .h/.c(pp) separation wasn't all but mandatory when targeting systems with plenty of resources. My apologies.


Interesting.
The clear separation of a declaration and an implementation is one of the things I really like with C and C++.
The header file has (should have) everything I need as a _user_ of the class, and nothing more.
Makes the intention of the class very clear, and then I can "hide" the implementation in a cpp file.

Also, this separation is not mandatory, if you want, you can write everything in the same file too. Just gets more messy :P
I really dislike how Java forces me to put everything in the same file...
Very hard to get an overview of the class without additional tools like a smart IDE or doxygen...

#1Olof Hedman

Posted 06 December 2012 - 02:50 AM


It's basically inherited from C, which was developed in a time when computers were sufficiently low on memory that they literally couldn't fit all the symbols necessary for a complex program in memory all at the same time and still have room for actual code. Programmers would be able to identify which symbols were really needed and include only those headers.


Thank you, though I should have been more clear in indicating that I do understand the reason, but simply cannot stand the additional handling complexity. Of course it has its raison d'etre even today (embedded systems come to mind), but I might see the language in a more positive light if the .h/.c(pp) separation wasn't all but mandatory when targeting systems with plenty of resources. My apologies.


Interesting.
The clear separation of a declaration and an implementation is one of the things I really like with C and C++.
The header file has (should have) everything I need as a _user_ of the class, and nothing more.
Makes the intention of the class very clear, and then I can "hide" the implementation in a cpp file.

Also, this separation is not mandatory, if you want, you can write everything in the same file too.
I really dislike how Java forces me to put everything in the same file...
Very hard to get an overview of the class without additional tools like a smart IDE or doxygen...

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