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#ActualCdrandin

Posted 08 December 2012 - 09:36 PM


From the little I have tried, I have found that unity scripting is a big pain in the rear. Pong is definitly a good place to start, although it really won't teach you much about unity's extensive tools for 3D, which is really the only reason to use unity over a C based language.
This is the official documentation for unity scripting: http://docs.unity3d....criptReference/. Unlike normal programming where it is all in the code, unity painfully goes back and forth between visual elements and code. I am not farmiliar with blender, but I find that unity is a good choice for learning, as it has a large community behind it and therefore an abundance of user-made documentation.

I don't see what you mean about Unity3D being "painful". I've been using Unity for years and I never thought the scripting language (which is UnityScript, though you can use C# or Boo if you want) was annoying. UnityScript is easier and faster to write code with than C# from my experience, because it automatically does some things that you would have to do manually in C#. There are some minor things C# can do that UnityScript can't, but they've never bothered me much.

To the OP:
Personally, I started programming by using Unity with 3D games, and I only had very slight experience with 2D from years ago, so you could say I hopped right into 3D scripting. I can't say whether this was "good" or "bad", as I think it depends on the individual. I often hear the most important thing is to just stick with one language/engine and roll with it until you get experienced. Programming experience is fairly general, so it will be helpful regardless of which language you're using.

You could definitely use Unity to make a Pong game, if you had an orthographic camera looking down on the paddles and didn't use the Y position of the paddles (the Y is up/down in Unity, the Z is forward/back, and the X is right/left). That way, you'd basically be "not using" the Y dimension, and you could just focus on the two that you need.

Unity also has built-in collisions and other such physics that you could learn the basics of by making a pong game.

If you're getting into Unity, I would suggest you bookmark this page, which has a search bar where you can look at classes and functions in the Unity engine, as well as a short little tutorial to get you started:
http://docs.unity3d....ence/index.html

Also, this website below is where you can go to ask specific questions about problems you're facing while using Unity:
http://answers.unity3d.com/

With some practice, I think you'll find that Unity is very powerful and flexible. Stick to the website and look through the documentation there, because it's very detailed and helpful!

Good luck!


Thanks very helpful. My intentional purpose was to create a 3D model platformer , but with a plane functionality. So essentially it acts like a 2D game, but with 3D modeling, which will be presented with a tilted camera perspective to present a wholesome figure. Always been my dream game to make something like that and I have always been attracted to platformers and MOBAs (but this will have to wait for a while since it is much more complex)

#1Cdrandin

Posted 08 December 2012 - 09:31 PM


From the little I have tried, I have found that unity scripting is a big pain in the rear. Pong is definitly a good place to start, although it really won't teach you much about unity's extensive tools for 3D, which is really the only reason to use unity over a C based language.
This is the official documentation for unity scripting: http://docs.unity3d....criptReference/. Unlike normal programming where it is all in the code, unity painfully goes back and forth between visual elements and code. I am not farmiliar with blender, but I find that unity is a good choice for learning, as it has a large community behind it and therefore an abundance of user-made documentation.

I don't see what you mean about Unity3D being "painful". I've been using Unity for years and I never thought the scripting language (which is UnityScript, though you can use C# or Boo if you want) was annoying. UnityScript is easier and faster to write code with than C# from my experience, because it automatically does some things that you would have to do manually in C#. There are some minor things C# can do that UnityScript can't, but they've never bothered me much.

To the OP:
Personally, I started programming by using Unity with 3D games, and I only had very slight experience with 2D from years ago, so you could say I hopped right into 3D scripting. I can't say whether this was "good" or "bad", as I think it depends on the individual. I often hear the most important thing is to just stick with one language/engine and roll with it until you get experienced. Programming experience is fairly general, so it will be helpful regardless of which language you're using.

You could definitely use Unity to make a Pong game, if you had an orthographic camera looking down on the paddles and didn't use the Y position of the paddles (the Y is up/down in Unity, the Z is forward/back, and the X is right/left). That way, you'd basically be "not using" the Y dimension, and you could just focus on the two that you need.

Unity also has built-in collisions and other such physics that you could learn the basics of by making a pong game.

If you're getting into Unity, I would suggest you bookmark this page, which has a search bar where you can look at classes and functions in the Unity engine, as well as a short little tutorial to get you started:
http://docs.unity3d....ence/index.html

Also, this website below is where you can go to ask specific questions about problems you're facing while using Unity:
http://answers.unity3d.com/

With some practice, I think you'll find that Unity is very powerful and flexible. Stick to the website and look through the documentation there, because it's very detailed and helpful!

Good luck!


Thanks very helpful. My intentional purpose was to create a 3D model platformer , but with a plane functionality. So essentially it acts like a 2D game, but with 3D modeling, which will be presented with a tiled camera perspective to present a wholesome figure. Always been my dream game to make something like that and I have always been attracted to platformers and MOBAs (but this will have to wait for a while since it is much more complex)

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