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#Actualfrob

Posted 08 December 2012 - 10:34 PM

And fair enough too, providing global education is in every-bodies interest. Is anyone still arguing that it should only be available to the wealthy ?

Edit : I believe that in The States there uni system is very different to ours, they have a a much stronger scholarship system than us, because basically we don't need it to get an education. I suppose it's a difference in perspective of who should pay for the nations education ... but that can become a slightly complex discussion in itself for a number of reasons.


In the US there are federal grants ('free' government money) available to everyone who needs it. The grants provide enough money to cover most of the tuition at most of the inexpensive state-run universities.

There are also academic scholarships available to basically everybody who studies. (Sadly, many students do not study.)

Those who choose to attend the less prestigious state schools can very easily have all tuition and fees covered by 'free' money.

Those who choose to attend more expensive schools are eligible for student loans to cover the difference in cost and to cover some of their living expenses while in school. The student loans are subsidized by the government, have very low interest rates, and can be placed in deferment if you lose your job, cannot work, or have other issues.

The system of student loans has an unfortunate flaw in that the money is given to the student rather than the school. For most students that money is used responsibly for academic expenses. As I mentioned in my story above, some people take the student loans and use it to subsidise their lifestyle rather than using it for scholarship. Those people are often the ones saddled by heavy student debt.

#2frob

Posted 08 December 2012 - 10:16 PM

And fair enough too, providing global education is in every-bodies interest. Is anyone still arguing that it should only be available to the wealthy ?

Edit : I believe that in The States there uni system is very different to ours, they have a a much stronger scholarship system than us, because basically we don't need it to get an education. I suppose it's a difference in perspective of who should pay for the nations education ... but that can become a slightly complex discussion in itself for a number of reasons.


In the US there are federal grants ('free' government money) available to everyone who needs it. The grants provide enough money to cover most of the tuition at most of the inexpensive state-run colleges.

There are also academic scholarships available to basically everybody who studies. (Sadly, many students do not study.)

Those who choose to attend the less prestigious state schools can very easily have all tuition and fees covered by 'free' money.

Those who choose to attend more expensive schools are eligible for student loans to cover the difference in cost and to cover some of their living expenses while in school. The student loans are subsidized by the government, have very low interest rates, and can be placed in deferment if you lose your job, cannot work, or have other issues.

The system of student loans has an unfortunate flaw in that the money is given to the student rather than the school. For most students that money is used responsibly for academic expenses. As I mentioned in my story above, some people take the student loans and use it to subsidise their lifestyle rather than using it for scholarship. Those people are often the ones saddled by heavy student debt.

#1frob

Posted 08 December 2012 - 10:15 PM

And fair enough too, providing global education is in every-bodies interest. Is anyone still arguing that it should only be available to the wealthy ?

Edit : I believe that in The States there uni system is very different to ours, they have a a much stronger scholarship system than us, because basically we don't need it to get an education. I suppose it's a difference in perspective of who should pay for the nations education ... but that can become a slightly complex discussion in itself for a number of reasons.


In the US there are federal grants ('free' government money) available to everyone who needs it. The grants are provide enough money to cover most of the tuition at most of the inexpensive state-run colleges.

There are also academic scholarships available to basically everybody who studies. (Sadly, many students do not study.)

Those who choose to attend the less prestigious state schools can very easily have all tuition and fees covered by 'free' money.

Those who choose to attend more expensive schools are eligible for student loans to cover the difference in cost and to cover some of their living expenses while in school. The student loans are subsidized by the government, have very low interest rates, and can be placed in deferment if you lose your job, cannot work, or have other issues.

The system of student loans has an unfortunate flaw in that the money is given to the student rather than the school. For most students that money is used responsibly for academic expenses. As I mentioned in my story above, some people take the student loans and use it to subsidise their lifestyle rather than using it for scholarship. Those people are often the ones saddled by heavy student debt.

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