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#ActualEctara

Posted 09 December 2012 - 12:40 PM

I believe the few beginners tutorials i have read have brought me through everything in the book and i have enough experience in the basics of it all.

Again, we cannot stress the experience. Doing tutorials only gives you experience in the topic of the tutorial. Tutorials rarely teach you error checking, as mentioned above. They rarely teach you how to make the best classes, "KISS" and "DRY" principles, or any good idea that has come through almost 15 years of the language.

For the most part, tutorials are quick hacks put together to achieve a purpose, posted on an unmoderated and unaccredited medium, so there is no standard of quality. A book, however, is much higher quality, and often has multiple authors, an editor, a review board, and a publishing house.

Put a step further, once you see a tutorial to show you what the language looks like, and its basic grammar, it's time to learn the rules. You need to learn from an authoritative book on C++ (not for Game Making or any express purpose, just the language), and finally learn _why_ the examples work. Then, learn _why_ everything else in the language. Tutorials are quick code samples made for showing you how. Books are made for teaching you why.

#2Ectara

Posted 09 December 2012 - 12:40 PM

I believe the few beginners tutorials i have read have brought me through everything in the book and i have enough experience in the basics of it all.

Again, we cannot stress the experience. Doing tutorials only gives you experience in the topic of the tutorial. Tutorials rarely teach you error checking, as mentioned above. They rarely teach you how to make the best classes, "KISS" and "DRY" principles, or any good idea that has come through almost 15 years of the language.

For the most part, tutorials are quick hacks put together to achieve a purpose, posted on an unmoderated and unaccredited medium, so there is no standard of quality. A book, however, is much higher quality, and often has multiple authors, and editor, goes through a review board, and a publishing house.

Put a step further, once you see a tutorial to show you what the language looks like, and its basic grammar, it's time to learn the rules. You need to learn from an authoritative book on C++ (not for Game Making or any express purpose, just the language), and finally learn _why_ the examples work. Then, learn _why_ everything else in the language. Tutorials are quick code samples made for showing you how. Books are made for teaching you why.

#1Ectara

Posted 09 December 2012 - 09:45 AM

I believe the few beginners tutorials i have read have brought me through everything in the book and i have enough experience in the basics of it all.

Again, we cannot stress the experience. Doing tutorials only gives you experience in the topic of the tutorial. Tutorials rarely teach you error checking, as mentioned above. They rarely teach you how to make the best classes, "KISS" and "DRY" principles, or any good idea that has come through almost 15 years of the language.

For the most part, tutorials are quick hacks put together to achieve a purpose, posted on an unmoderated and unaccredited medium, so there is no standard of quality. A book, however, is much higher quality, and often has multiple authors, and editor, goes through a review board, and a publishing house.

Put a step further, once you see a tutorial to show you what the language looks like, and it's basic grammar, it's time to learn the rules. You need to learn from an authoritative book on C++ (not for Game Making or any express purpose, just the language), and finally learn _why_ the examples work. Then, learn _why_ everything else in the language. Tutorials are quick code samples made for showing you how. Books are made for teaching you why.

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