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#Actualhybrid_ham

Posted 09 December 2012 - 11:12 PM

The competition for web developers is unbelievably fierce.
I've been doing it professionally for around 7 years but over 10 on my own as you have, I also started coding websites for fun before I went to college and got the official degree behind me. All that did really was let me barter for more money. There are people in India that will do website work for about $2USD an hour.

The web changes a lot. I have over 20 languages on my resume and only about 4 of them came from college, the rest I had to learn on my own. You simply can't stop reading in this field and noone pays you to read but they will expect you to know things before them. You also have to be ready to jump into specifications which can be technical but to do it well you have to dig deep. You have to keep up on security and exploits too. You have the added annoyance of browsers changing all the time. Add in mobile devices and you can build a site once then have to tweak it over 5 times or more to get it working in all browsers. SEO is what people will pay the most for but they are not going to help you maintain it. Clients don't want to create content but they want to be number 1 in searches. They don't want to update their graphics over time but they want to be number 1 and most appealing with their ancient site. The worst part is that the majority of them are cheap, cheap, cheap. They get so many things free online that they don't appreciate any of the knowledge it takes to make great websites. They will settle for frameworks and templates just to "get something up" then complain about it without seeking professional help.

Small businesses especially have extremely unrealistic ideas about a website, they will expect to hand you a 3 page pdf document and for you to make their site magnificent at the end of 3 days. They can't tell you why their company is better than any of the others and they can't sell you on who they are. They don't want to talk about the inner workings of their business for fear that someone will point out that they are doing it wrong. It will be up to you to be their marketing guru, graphic designer, and web developer all in one. In return they will buck at you and tell you that everything costs too much money.

When something is wrong on the website - the users never give you any details. It's broken is all they can tell you. You have to beg and goad the real information from them. What page were you on when it happened? What browser were you using? You will have to explain to many of them how to copy and paste or send a picture to you as a screenshot. Many of them are blathering idiots on their computers and aren't used to debugging anything so they don't talk technical - they say - It's broken, fix it. They won't read any instructions you give them on how to use their website, they will type their username or password wrong and still tell you that the site does not work, it's broken and it's your fault. It will take you over 30 minutes per email to aid these people because you have to screenshot every step for them and every click just to explain basic things. As long as 2 weeks will pass and they will again have the same problem and not refer to the original documentation but ask you again to explain it all. They want their hand held through the entire process, they are not peers, they don't know your world and don't care to understand it, they will only tell you, it's broken and blame it on you each time.


Good luck to you if you choose this line of work. The browser compatibilities make it challenging and the clients make it worse. How do you explain to them what has taken you years to learn in the 15 minute conversations they can put aside to talk about their website. It is indeed a challenge. The best sites to work on are the constant ones where a larger company is using their website for forms and sales or information presentation. Those are the clients that understand there will be cost involved and aren't penny pinching. They also will act as a good client and define their needs clearly instead of just complaining about everything you present them. Then there are the web designers and flash junkies that try to make template websites cheaper than you and quicker with little SEO planning. They are the ambulance chasers of the field, they can't exist without Dreamweaver and believe that the way to design is all images, nothing generated or creative in CSS. They will disgust you in time.

All this being said, I love my work, it's the people that sometimes ruin it, like most jobs.

#4hybrid_ham

Posted 09 December 2012 - 11:04 PM

The competition for web developers is unbelievably fierce.
I've been doing it professionally for around 7 years but over 10 on my own as you have, I also started coding websites for fun before I went to college and got the official degree behind me. All that did really was let me barter for more money. There are people in India that will do website work for about $2USD an hour.

The web changes a lot. I have over 20 languages on my resume and only about 4 of them came from college, the rest I had to learn on my own. You simply can't stop reading in this field and noone pays you to read but they will expect you to know things before them. You also have to be ready to jump into specifications which can be technical but to do it well you have to dig deep. You have to keep up on security and exploits too. You have the added annoyance of browsers changing all the time. Add in mobile devices and you can build a site once then have to tweak it over 5 times or more to get it working in all browsers. SEO is what people will pay the most for but they are not going to help you maintain it. Clients don't want to create content but they want to be number 1 in searches. They don't want to update their graphics over time but they want to be number 1 and most appealing with their ancient site. The worst part is that the majority of them are cheap, cheap, cheap. They get so many things free online that they don't appreciate any of the knowledge it takes to make great websites. They will settle for frameworks and templates just to "get something up" then complain about it without seeking professional help.

Small businesses especially have extremely unrealistic ideas about a website, they will expect to hand you a 3 page pdf document and for you to make their site magnificent at the end of 3 days. They can't tell you why their company is better than any of the others and they can't sell you on who they are. They don't want to talk about the inner workings of their business for fear that someone will point out that they are doing it wrong. It will be up to you to be their marketing guru, graphic designer, and web developer all in one. In return they will buck at you and tell you that everything costs too much money.


Good luck to you if you choose this line of work. The browser compatibilities make it challenging and the clients make it worse. How do you explain to them what has taken you years to learn in the 15 minute conversations they can put aside to talk about their website. It is indeed a challenge. The best sites to work on are the constant ones where a larger company is using their website for forms and sales or information presentation. Those are the clients that understand there will be cost involved and aren't penny pinching. They also will act as a good client and define their needs clearly instead of just complaining about everything you present them. Then there are the web designers and flash junkies that try to make template websites cheaper than you and quicker with little SEO planning. They are the ambulance chasers of the field, they can't exist without Dreamweaver and believe that the way to design is all images, nothing generated or creative in CSS. They will disgust you in time.

All this being said, I love my work, it's the people that sometimes ruin it, like most jobs.

#3hybrid_ham

Posted 09 December 2012 - 11:03 PM

The competition for web developers is unbelievably fierce.
I've been doing it professionally for around 7 years but over 10 on my own as you have, I also started coding websites for fun before I went to college and got the official degree behind me. All that did really was let me barter for more money. There are people in India that will do website work for about $2USD an hour.

The web changes a lot. I have over 20 languages on my resume and only about 4 of them came from college, the rest I had to learn on my own. You simply can't stop reading in this field. You also have to be ready to jump into specifications which can be technical but to do it well you have to dig deep. You have to keep up on security and exploits too. You have the added annoyance of browsers changing all the time. Add in mobile devices and you can build a site once then have to tweak it over 5 times or more to get it working in all browsers. SEO is what people will pay the most for but they are not going to help you maintain it. Clients don't want to create content but they want to be number 1 in searches. They don't want to update their graphics over time but they want to be number 1 and most appealing with their ancient site. The worst part is that the majority of them are cheap, cheap, cheap. They get so many things free online that they don't appreciate any of the knowledge it takes to make great websites. They will settle for frameworks and templates just to "get something up" then complain about it without seeking professional help.

Small businesses especially have extremely unrealistic ideas about a website, they will expect to hand you a 3 page pdf document and for you to make their site magnificent at the end of 3 days. They can't tell you why their company is better than any of the others and they can't sell you on who they are. They don't want to talk about the inner workings of their business for fear that someone will point out that they are doing it wrong. It will be up to you to be their marketing guru, graphic designer, and web developer all in one. In return they will buck at you and tell you that everything costs too much money.


Good luck to you if you choose this line of work. The browser compatibilities make it challenging and the clients make it worse. How do you explain to them what has taken you years to learn in the 15 minute conversations they can put aside to talk about their website. It is indeed a challenge. The best sites to work on are the constant ones where a larger company is using their website for forms and sales or information presentation. Those are the clients that understand there will be cost involved and aren't penny pinching. They also will act as a good client and define their needs clearly instead of just complaining about everything you present them. Then there are the web designers and flash junkies that try to make template websites cheaper than you and quicker with little SEO planning. They are the ambulance chasers of the field, they can't exist without Dreamweaver and believe that the way to design is all images, nothing generated or creative in CSS. They will disgust you in time.

All this being said, I love my work, it's the people that sometimes ruin it, like most jobs.

#2hybrid_ham

Posted 09 December 2012 - 10:46 PM

The competition for web developers is unbelievably fierce.
I've been doing it professionally for around 7 years but over 10 on my own as you have, I also started coding websites for fun before I went to college and got the official degree behind me. All that did really was let me barter for more money. There are people in India that will do website work for about $2USD an hour.

The web changes a lot. You have the added annoyance of browsers changing all the time too. Add in mobile devices and you can build a site once then have to tweak it over 5 times or more to get it working in all browsers. SEO is what people will pay the most for but they are not going to help you maintain it. Clients don't want to create content but they want to be number 1 in searches. They don't want to update their graphics over time but they want to be number 1 and most appealing with their ancient site. The worst part is that the majority of them are cheap, cheap, cheap. They get so many things free online that they don't appreciate any of the knowledge it takes to make great websites. They will settle for frameworks and templates just to "get something up" then complain about it without seeking professional help.

Small businesses especially have extremely unrealistic ideas about a website, they will expect to hand you a 3 page pdf document and for you to make their site magnificent at the end of 3 days. They can't tell you why their company is better than any of the others and they can't sell you on who they are. They don't want to talk about the inner workings of their business for fear that someone will point out that they are doing it wrong. It will be up to you to be their marketing guru, graphic designer, and web developer all in one. In return they will buck at you and tell you that everything costs too much money.


Good luck to you if you choose this line of work. The browser compatibilities make it challenging and the clients make it worse. How do you explain to them what has taken you years to learn in the 15 minute conversations they can put aside to talk about their website. It is indeed a challenge. The best sites to work on are the constant ones where a larger company is using their website for forms and sales or information presentation. Those are the clients that understand there will be cost involved and aren't penny pinching. They also will act as a good client and define their needs clearly instead of just complaining about everything you present them. Then there are the web designers and flash junkies that try to make template websites cheaper than you and quicker with little SEO planning. They are the ambulance chasers of the field, they can't exist without Dreamweaver and believe that the way to design is all images, nothing generated or creative in CSS. They will disgust you in time.

All this being said, I love my work, it's the people that sometimes ruin it, like most jobs.

#1hybrid_ham

Posted 09 December 2012 - 10:37 PM

The competition for web developers is unbelievably fierce.
I've been doing it professionally for around 7 years but over 10 on my own as you have, I also started coding websites for fun before I went to college and got the official degree behind me. All that did really was let me barter for more money.

The web changes a lot. You have the added annoyance of browsers changing all the time too. Add in mobile devices and you can build a site once then have to tweak it over 5 times or more to get it working in all browsers. SEO is what people will pay the most for but they are not going to help you maintain it. Clients don't want to create content but they want to be number 1 in searches. They don't want to update their graphics over time but they want to be number 1 and most appealing with their ancient site. The worst part is that the majority of them are cheap, cheap, cheap. They get so many things free online that they don't appreciate any of the knowledge it takes to make great websites. They will settle for frameworks and templates just to "get something up" then complain about it without seeking professional help.

Small businesses especially have extremely unrealistic ideas about a website, they will expect to hand you a 3 page pdf document and for you to make their site magnificent at the end of 3 days. They can't tell you why their company is better than any of the others and they can't sell you on who they are. They don't want to talk about the inner workings of their business for fear that someone will point out that they are doing it wrong. It will be up to you to be their marketing guru, graphic designer, and web developer all in one. In return they will buck at you and tell you that everything costs too much money.


Good luck to you if you choose this line of work. The browser compatibilities make it challenging and the clients make it worse. How do you explain to them what has taken you years to learn in the 15 minute conversations they can put aside to talk about their website. It is indeed a challenge. The best sites to work on are the constant ones where a larger company is using their website for forms and sales or information presentation. Those are the clients that understand there will be cost involved and aren't penny pinching. They also will act as a good client and define their needs clearly instead of just complaining about everything you present them. Then there are the web designers and flash junkies that try to make template websites cheaper than you and quicker with little SEO planning. They are the ambulance chasers of the field, they can't exist without Dreamweaver and believe that the way to design is all images, nothing generated or creative in CSS. They will disgust you in time.

All this being said, I love my work, it's the people that sometimes ruin it, like most jobs.

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