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#Actual3Ddreamer

Posted 10 December 2012 - 02:12 PM


The sadest part of this story is: they(persons) will teach us this crap(XNA) in the uni after this X-mas, instead of changing the program.


ah.. dont worry. XNA is perfectly fine to learn the basics of game development. You won't be using what the teach you there anyway, whatever they teach you. Being a gamedev means adapt and learn something new every week.. there are so many new exciting things to explore, even without leaving the C# world... and each one of them has something to be learn from.
Techs cannot be updated and maintained forever, at the certain point it is necessary to acknowledge that a mistake was made and stop before making a bigger mistake. The future of XNA is MonoGame.. time will tell if MS lost a big chance with this one.. but, I really don't think so Posted Image


This is perfect thinking for success with almost any SDK and language. Posted Image

Just for helping new game makers, it is so very important to complete each project well before moving to the next, even if that includes scrapping a particular game source code to start it fresh - usually does not happen but sometimes needed - yet really explore each game's potential. The same general principle applies to an SDK, even XNA. Hopping like a frog, rabbit, or grasshopper from one thing to another is simply a strategy for staying lightweight, but learning to be methodical in a general sense with innovation on specific needs requires a habit of completing each tour of accomplishment, considering each a kind of mission. Generally the better the organization created by the game developer, then the greater the potential for creating games.

If ever there is a time to drop something like XNA or leave something else to try XNA, that would be early in working with an SDK. This is why I recommend to people to stay where you are until you have accomplished your goals in that area or feel like throwing the computer onto the street outside. A lot of it is a matter of the thoughts we choose to maintain in our course through game development, hopefully positive and progressive.


Clinton

#23Ddreamer

Posted 10 December 2012 - 02:09 PM


The sadest part of this story is: they(persons) will teach us this crap(XNA) in the uni after this X-mas, instead of changing the program.


ah.. dont worry. XNA is perfectly fine to learn the basics of game development. You won't be using what the teach you there anyway, whatever they teach you. Being a gamedev means adapt and learn something new every week.. there are so many new exciting things to explore, even without leaving the C# world... and each one of them has something to be learn from.
Techs cannot be updated and maintained forever, at the certain point it is necessary to acknowledge that a mistake was made and stop before making a bigger mistake. The future of XNA is MonoGame.. time will tell if MS lost a big chance with this one.. but, I really don't think so Posted Image


This is perfect thinking for success with almost any SDK and language. Posted Image

Just for helping new game makers, it is so very important to complete each project well before moving to the next, even if that includes scrapping a particular game source code to start it fresh - usually does not happen but sometimes needed - yet really explore each game's potential. The same general principle applies to an SDK, even XNA. Hopping like a frog, rabbit, or grasshopper from one thing to another is simply a strategy for staying lightweight, but learning to be methodical in a general sense with innovation on specific needs requires a habit of completing each tour of accomplishment, considering each a kind of mission. Generally the better the organization created by the game developer, then the greater the potential for creating games.

If ever there is a time to drop something like XNA or leave something else to try XNA, that would be early in working with an SDK. This is why I recommend to people to stay where you are until you have exhausted your options in that area or feel like throwing the computer onto the street outside. A lot of it is a matter of the thoughts we choose to maintain in our course through game development, hopefully positive and progressive.


Clinton

#13Ddreamer

Posted 10 December 2012 - 02:08 PM


The sadest part of this story is: they(persons) will teach us this crap(XNA) in the uni after this X-mas, instead of changing the program.


ah.. dont worry. XNA is perfectly fine to learn the basics of game development. You won't be using what the teach you there anyway, whatever they teach you. Being a gamedev means adapt and learn something new every week.. there are so many new exciting things to explore, even without leaving the C# world... and each one of them has something to be learn from.
Techs cannot be updated and maintained forever, at the certain point it is necessary to acknowledge that a mistake was made and stop before making a bigger mistake. The future of XNA is MonoGame.. time will tell if MS lost a big chance with this one.. but, I really don't think so Posted Image


This is perfect thinking for success with almost any SDK and language. Posted Image

Just for helping new game makers, it is so very important to complete each project well before moving to the next, even if that means scrapping a particular game source code to start it fresh - usually does not happen but sometimes needed - yet really explore each game's potential. The same general principle applies to an SDK, even XNA. Hopping like a frog, rabbit, or grasshopper from one thing to another is simply a strategy for staying lightweight, but learning to be methodical in a general sense with innovation on specific needs requires a habit of completing each tour of accomplishment, considering each a kind of mission. Generally the better the organization created by the game developer, then the greater the potential for creating games.

If ever there is a time to drop something like XNA or leave something else to try XNA, that would be early in working with an SDK. This is why I recommend to people to stay where you are until you have exhausted your options in that area or feel like throwing the computer onto the street outside. A lot of it is a matter of the thoughts we choose to maintain in our course through game development, hopefully positive and progressive.


Clinton

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