Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

#Actualsuperman3275

Posted 13 December 2012 - 09:44 PM

Object-Oriented programming hardly produces error-prone, mangled code. In fact, I would say (And this is someone who came from only procedural programming to C++ around two years ago) that object-oriented programming reduces errors, nevermind making your code far more understandable.

if (Object.size() < Object.MaximumSize)
{
Object.IncreaseSize;
}
This code makes sense, rather than having to use weird structs and arrays, or collections of values that require commenting to explain the correlation. I also recently wrote an article on The Auto Variable (A great new C++11 feature).

As a list, well, I'm not sure. Here are some (very useful) highlights:
  • The Auto Variable
  • Constexpr
  • Vectors
  • Objects, in General
  • auto pointers
  • weak pointers
  • etc.
There are just far too many great C++(11) features. C hasn't been updated since 1999, also, which means many C++ features that are commonplace in many programming languages now might never reach C (However I hope they make a new standard, it's definitely rejuvinate the language).

#1superman3275

Posted 13 December 2012 - 09:44 PM

Object-Oriented programming hardly produces error-prone, mangled code. In fact, I would say (And this is someone who came from only procedural programming to C++ around two years ago) that object-oriented programming reduces errors, nevermind making your code far more understandable.

if (Object.size() < Object.MaximumSize)
{
Object.IncreaseSize;
}
This code makes sense, rather than having to use weird structs and arrays, or collections of values that require commenting to explain the correlation. I also recently wrote an article on The Auto Variable (A great new C++11 feature).

As a list, well, I'm not sure. Here are some (very useful) highlights:
  • The Auto Variable
  • Constexpr
  • Vectors
  • Objects, in General
  • auto pointers
  • weak pointers
  • etc.
There are just far too many great C++(11) features. C hasn't been updated sine 1999, also, which means many C++ features that are commonplace in many programming languages now might never reach C (However I hope they make a new standard, it's definitely rejuvinate the language).

PARTNERS