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#ActualL. Spiro

Posted 19 December 2012 - 07:32 AM

That is probably because you are clamping between -90° and 90° instead of using an epsilon as I suggested (you didn’t provide any code so who can know?).
Clamp between -89° and 89°. You can’t look straight up if your math is hard-coded to use (0.0, 1.0, 0.0) for up in your cross products. You can’t calculate a right vector if both your forward (“look”) and world up vectors are the same.


L. Spiro

#3L. Spiro

Posted 19 December 2012 - 12:00 AM

That is probably because you are clamping between -90° and 90° instead of using an epsilon as I suggested (you didn’t provide any code so who can know?).
Clamp between -89° and 89°. You can’t look straight up if your math is hard-coded to use (0.0, 1.0, 0.0) for up in your dot products. You can’t calculate a right vector if both your forward (“look”) and world up vectors are the same.


L. Spiro

#2L. Spiro

Posted 19 December 2012 - 12:00 AM

That is probably because you are clamping between -90° and 90° instead of using an epsilon as I suggested (you didn’t provide any code so who can know?).
Clamp between -89° and 89°. You can’t look straight up if your math is hard-coded to use (0.0, 1.0, 0.0) for up in your dot products. You can’t calculate a right vector if both your forward (“look”) and up vectors are the same.


L. Spiro

#1L. Spiro

Posted 18 December 2012 - 11:58 PM

That is probably because you are clamping between -90° and 90° instead of using an epsilon as I suggested (you didn’t provide any code so who can know?).
Clamp between -89° and 89°. You can’t look straight up if your math is hard-coded to use (0.0, 1.0, 0.0) for up in your dot products. You can’t calculate a right vector if both your forward (look) and up vectors are the same.


L. Spiro

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