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#Actualsamoth

Posted 19 December 2012 - 10:37 AM

vastly increased number of impacts from space (due to a lesser atmosphere and minor magnetic field to protect it)... So really you are unlikely to see the moons from under 20+ feet of rock.

Make that 200 feet, if you plan for (minor) impacts. 20 feet of rock just evaporate on an impact (for anything much larger than a millimeter of diameter or so). As there's practically no atmosphere, something coming from space will have more or less the same speed and mass upon impact as in space (much different from e.g. on Earth).

#1samoth

Posted 19 December 2012 - 10:37 AM

vastly increased number of impacts from space (due to a lesser atmosphere and minor magnetic field to protect it)... So really you are unlikely to see the moons from under 20+ feet of rock.

Make that 200 feet, if you plan for (minor) impacts. 20 feet of rock just evaporate on an impact (for anything much larger than a millimeter or so). As there's practically no atmosphere, so something coming from space will have more or less the same speed and mass upon impact as in space (much different from e.g. on Earth).

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