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#ActualBCullis

Posted 19 December 2012 - 01:46 PM

Sorry if I covered something you were already doing. I prefer to undershoot and be corrected than fire over someone's head and make them ask for an explanation.

Part of the problem might be that you're tackling multiple fields at once, based on how you phrased that. 3d modeling (the art side) has its own terminology and best-practices list, independent of the terms, concepts, and math for the code side. You can cull out a lot of the modeling portion by just focusing on the geometry part of modeling (just vertex/face/topology manipulation). Once you get more comfortable with the building portion, then you can add on UV mapping for the texture, or your 3d tool's material editor.

As for the code, this is one of the reasons a higher-level framework is suggested for beginners in 3d: your list keeps growing likely because you keep discovering lower and lower levels of code that people might bring up. Something like UDK or Unity just lets you stop at the "import model" level. Lower level stuff (like directly programming and controlling the render pipeline for Direct3D) brings its own laundry list of new concepts.

Like 0r0d mentioned, give it time. Eventually you do get a good grip on a certain threshold of information, and that'll make successive additions to your skillset easier to aquire.

#1BCullis

Posted 19 December 2012 - 01:45 PM

Sorry if I covered something you were already doing. I prefer to undershoot and be corrected than fire over someone's head and make them ask for an explanation.

Part of the problem might be that you're tackling multiple fields at once, based on how you phrased that. 3d modeling (the art side) has its own terminology and best-practices list, independent of the terms, concepts, and math for the code side. You can cull out a lot of the modeling portion by just focusing on the geometry part of modeling (just vertex/face/topology manipulation). Once you get more comfortable with the building portion, then you can add on UV mapping for the texture, or your 3d tool's material editor.

As for the code, this is one of the reasons a higher-level framework is suggested for beginners in 3d: your list keeps growing likely because you keep discovering lower and lower levels of code that people might bring up. Something like UDK or Unity just lets you stop at the "import model" level. Lower level stuff (like directly programming and controlling the render pipeline for Direct3D) brings its own laundry list of new concepts.

Like 0r0d mentioned, give it time. Eventually you do get a good grip on a certain threshold of information, and that'll make successive additions to your skillset easier to aquire.

Long story short: you're tackling two completely different fields (challenging on their own) at the same time.

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