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#ActualRobMaddison

Posted 20 December 2012 - 02:58 PM

There are some amazingly helpful people on here who have some really quite brilliant advice but I think sometimes it becomes a bit repetitive where something subjective is in discussion and I can't think of anything more subjective than "games or engines?".

If someone wants to write engines, they will. If they've got to the point where they have an interest in engines, they've probably already made their mind up and nobody on here is going to make them think "wow, writing games not engines, now why didn't I think of that". If they want to write games on the other hand, the same thing applies, that's what they'll do.

I find that 9 times out of 10, the people who come on here wanting to write the next angry birds usually want to write a game, not an engine. That's fine, no need to tell them to write games not engines.

I am writing an engine and I get massive amounts of satisfaction from it, it's the most therapeutic thing I can think of doing. I thrive on finding out how things work and trying to do them myself. Will I end up with a game? Probably not but anyone who wants to write an engine, generally has an idea of the type of game it might be suitable for, 2d, 3d, etc. you don't need a full game spec to write an engine, it's really fun trying to think of how an animation system might be used, or how particle effects might be used. It's also great for coding practice from an architecture perspective - who cares if it makes a game or not. Same goes for creating games, who cares if it makes a great engine or not, as long as you're enjoying yourself - at the end of the day, isn't that what we're here for?

I say let's just agree that if someone wants to do something, they've already made up their mind and let's help them with what they're trying to do. If someone has no clue about games or engines and is asking advice on which is best to start on, then we should be asking questions like "what are you interested in? What are your goals?" and so on.

Debates like these are always healthy but surely this particular subject has been discussed too much....?

The OP asked about shader permutations and it sounds like he wants to write an engine and isn't just messing about - shall we concentrate on that?

I just wanted to very quickly add, I don't disagree with any responses on here, just that a useful-sounding first post has turned, once again, into "write x not y"

#2RobMaddison

Posted 20 December 2012 - 02:57 PM

There are some amazingly helpful people on here who have some really quite brilliant advice but I think sometimes it becomes a bit repetitive where something subjective is in discussion and I can't think of anything more subjective than "games or engines?".

If someone wants to write engines, they will. If they've got to the point where they have an interest in engines, they've probably already made their mind up and nobody on here is going to make them think "wow, writing games not engines, now why didn't I think of that". If they want to write games on the other hand, the same thing applies, that's what they'll do.

I find that 9 times out of 10, the people who come on here wanting to write the next angry birds usually want to write a game, not an engine. That's fine, no need to tell them to write games not engines.

I am writing an engine and I get massive amounts of satisfaction from it, it's the most therapeutic thing I can think of doing. I thrive on finding out how things work and trying to do them myself. Will I end up with a game? Probably not but anyone who wants to write an engine, generally has an idea of the type of game it might be suitable for, 2d, 3d, etc. you don't need a full game spec to write an engine, it's really fun trying to think of how an animation system might be used, or how particle effects might be used. It's also great for coding practice from an architecture perspective - who cares if it makes a game or not. Same goes for creating games, who cares if it makes a great engine or not, as long as you're enjoying yourself - at the end of the day, isn't that what we're here for?

I say let's just agree that if someone wants to do something, they've already made up their mind and let's help them with what they're trying to do. If someone has no clue about games or engines and is asking advice on which is best to start on, then we should be asking questions like "what are you interested in? What are your goals?" and so on.

Debates like these are always healthy but surely this particular subject has been discussed too much....?

The OP asked about shader permutations and it sounds like he wants to write an engine and isn't just messing about - shall we concentrate on that?

I just wanted to very quickly add, I don't disagree with any responses on here, just that a useful-sounded first post has turned, once again, into "write x not y"

#1RobMaddison

Posted 20 December 2012 - 02:48 PM

There are some amazingly helpful people on here who have some really quite brilliant advice but I think sometimes it becomes a bit repetitive where something subjective is in discussion and I can't think of anything more subjective than "games or engines?".

If someone wants to write engines, they will. If they've got to the point where they have an interest in engines, they've probably already made their mind up and nobody on here is going to make them think "wow, writing games not engines, now why didn't I think of that". If they want to write games on the other hand, the same thing applies, that's what they'll do.

I find that 9 times out of 10, the people who come on here wanting to write the next angry birds usually want to write a game, not an engine. That's fine, no need to tell them to write games not engines.

I am writing an engine and I get massive amounts of satisfaction from it, it's the most therapeutic thing I can think of doing. I thrive on finding out how things work and trying to do them myself. Will I end up with a game? Probably not but anyone who wants to write an engine, generally has an idea of the type of game it might be suitable for, 2d, 3d, etc. you don't need a full game spec to write an engine, it's really fun trying to think of how an animation system might be used, or how particle effects might be used. It's also great for coding practice from an architecture perspective - who cares if it makes a game or not. Same goes for creating games, who cares if it makes a great engine or not, as long as you're enjoying yourself - at the end of the day, isn't that what we're here for?

I say let's just agree that if someone wants to do something, they've already made up their mind and let's help them with what they're trying to do. If someone has no clue about games or engines and is asking advice on which is best to start on, then we should be asking questions like "what are you interested in? What are your goals?" and so on.

Debates like these are always healthy but surely this particular subject has been discussed too much....?

The OP asked about shader permutations and it sounds like he wants to write an engine and isn't just messing about - shall we concentrate on that?

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