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#ActualSimonForsman

Posted 21 December 2012 - 05:21 PM

<p><p>





Window Creation/Input/etc.
Some platform specific "glue" (i.e. Java for Android) to create a window, handle input etc. built for each platform.

Among the platforms you listed the only glue would be on iOS using Objective-C or Objective-C++ in a maximum of 3 files.
For Android, use NativeActivity (or better yet, conserve your sanity and don’t target Android). Seriously if you are just starting out in cross-platform development you shouldn’t compound your troubles by doing native development for Android. I watched my coworker’s heart turn black starting since his task was to port our engine to Android, and I am still trying to change his heart back to its original green.

<p><p>My first set of questions is that we're having difficultly determining if this approach will work for the Windows Store/Phone version, specifically:

  • Can we reference external C libraries in a Windows Phone/Store app?
Yes.

The next question I think is more a symptom of my own ignorance of C++/Objective-C more than anything else:
  • As C++/Objective-C are supersets of C, if I write straight C, can I simply compile it as C++/Objective-C
Yes.


L. Spiro
Hmm, my long post disappeared....

Ah well, Just wanted to add, i started making my own Android/iOS game/"engine" (And i've made crossplatform games/"engines" for Win+Linux before) and quite quickly switched to Unity when i noticed just how much time i would have to spend fixing device or version specific issues. (just look at the changelog for Unity3D, Android gets more than twice the number of fixes iOS does, a fairly large number of the Android fixes are for a specific device, a specific architecture, a specific Android version (or group of versions), a specific GPU/GPU vendor, etc. it is quite nice to have someone else take care of that mess for you. (Allthough Unity obviously havn't fixed all device specific issues since they keep adding new device specific fixes in each minor release)

#2SimonForsman

Posted 21 December 2012 - 05:12 PM

<p>



Window Creation/Input/etc.
Some platform specific "glue" (i.e. Java for Android) to create a window, handle input etc. built for each platform.

Among the platforms you listed the only glue would be on iOS using Objective-C or Objective-C++ in a maximum of 3 files.
For Android, use NativeActivity (or better yet, conserve your sanity and don’t target Android). Seriously if you are just starting out in cross-platform development you shouldn’t compound your troubles by doing native development for Android. I watched my coworker’s heart turn black starting since his task was to port our engine to Android, and I am still trying to change his heart back to its original green.

<p>My first set of questions is that we're having difficultly determining if this approach will work for the Windows Store/Phone version, specifically:

  • Can we reference external C libraries in a Windows Phone/Store app?
Yes.

The next question I think is more a symptom of my own ignorance of C++/Objective-C more than anything else:
  • As C++/Objective-C are supersets of C, if I write straight C, can I simply compile it as C++/Objective-C
Yes.


L. Spiro

Hmm, my long post disappeared....

Ah well, Just wanted to add, i started making my own Android/iOS engine and quite quickly switched to Unity when i noticed just how much time i would have to spend fixing device or version specific issues. (Take a look at the changelog for Unity3D, Android gets more than twice the number of fixes iOS does, a fairly large number of the Android fixes are for a specific device, a specific architecture, a specific Android version (or group of versions), aspecific GPU/GPU vendor, etc. it is quite nice to have someone else take care of that for you. (Allthough Unity obviously havn't fixed all device specific issues since they keep adding new device specific fixes in each minor release)

#1SimonForsman

Posted 21 December 2012 - 05:05 PM

Window Creation/Input/etc.
Some platform specific "glue" (i.e. Java for Android) to create a window, handle input etc. built for each platform.

Among the platforms you listed the only glue would be on iOS using Objective-C or Objective-C++ in a maximum of 3 files.
For Android, use NativeActivity (or better yet, conserve your sanity and don’t target Android). Seriously if you are just starting out in cross-platform development you shouldn’t compound your troubles by doing native development for Android. I watched my coworker’s heart turn black starting since his task was to port our engine to Android, and I am still trying to change his heart back to its original green.

My first set of questions is that we're having difficultly determining if this approach will work for the Windows Store/Phone version, specifically:

  • Can we reference external C libraries in a Windows Phone/Store app?
Yes.

The next question I think is more a symptom of my own ignorance of C++/Objective-C more than anything else:
  • As C++/Objective-C are supersets of C, if I write straight C, can I simply compile it as C++/Objective-C

Yes.


L. Spiro

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