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#ActualOlof Hedman

Posted 25 December 2012 - 07:50 AM

You have a lot more temporal and spatial bleeding of colors, which makes everything look smother and rounder, and lines more straight, but I'm not sure that means "higher fidelity", and it's not the same thing as anti-alias, even though the effect on straight lines are similar.
It hides error, but it does it in a way more like blurring then proper anti-alias.

Visual and vernier acuity is properties of your eyes (in combination with our brains), not of your monitor, though your right these concepts are important, and makes more measurements then pure resolution important for deciding image quality.
Sure, the arrangement of RGB cells in an LCD will produce artefacts that are not present on a CRT, which increase the blocky feeling, but I'd still say an LCD is more "crisp", and also that this is part of the problem.

The thing I reacted most on though was to reduce the resolution of your LCD as a solution, and calling the resulting image "crisper".
you can't get a crisper image from undersampling...
since he reduced it to probably the same resolution as his old CRT (unless he had a really expensive one), I felt simulating CRT was not that far off.

Proper antialias (however implemented) will calculate your image at a higher resolution to be able to accurately represent features smaller then a pixel in the pixel grid.
This truly increases fidelity specially in moving images.

#5Olof Hedman

Posted 25 December 2012 - 07:28 AM

You have a lot more temporal and spatial bleeding of colors, which makes everything look smother and rounder, and lines more straight, but I'm not sure that means "higher fidelity", and it's not the same thing as anti-alias, even though the effect on straight lines are similar.
It hides error, but it does it in a way more like blurring then proper anti-alias.

Visual and vernier acuity is properties of your eyes (in combination with our brains), not of your monitor, though of course these concepts are important.
Sure, the arrangement of RGB cells in an LCD will produce artefacts that are not present on a CRT, which increase the blocky feeling, but I'd still say an LCD is more "crisp", and also that this is part of the problem.

The thing I reacted most on though was to reduce the resolution of your LCD as a solution, and calling the resulting image "crisper".
you can't get a crisper image from undersampling...
since he reduced it to probably the same resolution as his old CRT (unless he had a really expensive one), I felt simulating CRT was not that far off.

Proper antialias (however implemented) will calculate your image at a higher resolution to be able to accurately represent features smaller then a pixel in the pixel grid.
This truly increases fidelity specially in moving images.

#4Olof Hedman

Posted 25 December 2012 - 06:41 AM

You have a lot more temporal and spatial bleeding of colors, which makes everything look smother and rounder, and lines more straight, but I'm not sure that means "higher fidelity", and it's not the same thing as anti-alias, even though the effect on straight lines are similar.
It hides error, but it does it in a way more like blurring then proper anti-alias.

Visual and vernier acuity is properties of your eyes (in combination with our brains), not of your monitor, though of course these concepts are important.
Sure, the arrangement of RGB cells in an LCD will produce artefacts that are not present on a CRT, which increase the blocky feeling, but I'd still say an LCD is more "crisp", and also that this is part of the problem.

The thing I reacted most on though was to reduce the resolution of your LCD as a solution, and calling the resulting image "crisper".
you can't get a crisper image from undersampling...
since he reduced it to probably the same resolution as his old CRT (unless he had a really expensive one), I felt simulating CRT was not that far off.

Proper antialias (however implemented) will calculate your image at a higher resolution to be able to accurately represent features smaller then a pixel in the pixel grid.
This truly increases fidelity specially in moving images.

(And how someone can't see the benefit of high resolution high fidelity images is beyond me... Of course not sacrificing framerate for it, for accurate representation animation movement, frame rate is usually more important.)

#3Olof Hedman

Posted 25 December 2012 - 06:39 AM

You have a lot more temporal and spatial bleeding of colors, which makes everything look smother and rounder, and lines more straight, but I'm not sure that means "higher fidelity", and it's not the same thing as anti-alias, even though the effect on straight lines are similar.
It hides error, but it does it in a way more like blurring then proper anti-alias.

Visual and vernier acuity is properties of your eyes (in combination with our brains), not of your monitor, though of course these concepts are important.
Sure, the arrangement of RGB cells in an LCD will produce artefacts that are not present on a CRT, which increase the blocky feeling, but I'd still say an LCD is more "crisp", and also that this is part of the problem.

The thing I reacted most on though was to reduce the resolution of your LCD as a solution, and calling the resulting image "crisper".
you can't get a crisper image from undersampling...
since he reduced it to probably the same resolution as his old CRT (unless he had a really expensive one), I felt simulating CRT was not that far off.

Proper antialias (however implemented) will calculate your image at a higher resolution to be able to accurately represent features smaller then a pixel in the pixel grid.
This truly increases fidelity specially in moving images.

#2Olof Hedman

Posted 25 December 2012 - 06:27 AM

You have a lot more temporal and spatial bleeding of colors, which makes everything look smother and rounder, and lines more straight, but I'm not sure that means "higher fidelity", and it's not the same thing as anti-alias, even though the effect on straight lines are similar.
It hides error, but it does it in a way more like blurring then proper anti-alias.

Visual and vernier acuity is properties of your eyes (in combination with our brains), not of your monitor, though of course these concepts are important.
Sure, the arrangement of RGB cells in an LCD will produce artefacts that are not present on a CRT, which increase the blocky feeling, but I'd still say an LCD is more "crisp", and also that this is part of the problem.

The thing I reacted most on though was to reduce the resolution of your LCD as a solution, and calling the resulting image "crisper".
you can't get a crisper image from undersampling...

Proper antialias (however implemented) will calculate your image at a higher resolution to be able to accurately represent features smaller then a pixel in the pixel grid.
This truly increases fidelity specially in moving images.

#1Olof Hedman

Posted 25 December 2012 - 06:24 AM

You have a lot more temporal and spatial bleeding of colors, which makes everything look smother and rounder, and lines more straight, but I'm not sure that means "higher fidelity", and it's not the same thing as anti-alias, even though the effect on straight lines are similar.

It hides error, but it does it in a way more like blurring then proper anti-alias.

 

Visual and vernier acuity is properties of your eyes, not of your monitor, though of course these concepts are important.

Sure, the arrangement of RGB cells in an LCD will produce artefacts that are not present on a CRT, which increase the blocky feeling, but I'd still say an LCD is more "crisp", and also that this is part of the problem.

 

The thing I reacted most on though was to reduce the resolution of your LCD as a solution, and calling the resulting image "crisper".

you can't get a crisper image from undersampling...

 

Proper antialias (however implemented) will calculate your image at a higher resolution to be able to accurately represent features smaller then a pixel in the pixel grid.

This truly increases fidelity specially in moving images.


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