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#Actualfrob

Posted 25 December 2012 - 09:11 PM

It depends.

Many games will leave v-sync on, so flipping buffers will block, which results in a natural capping.

Since you are a beginner in the For Beginner's forum I'll explain in a bit more detail. The video card accumulates all the rendering commands and buffers them. They are not actually shown to the user until the display is swapped. By default, that swap takes place during the v-sync, the time it would take for an older CRT beam to go from the bottom of the screen to the top of the screen. Usually you see that on newer LCDs as 60Hz, 75Hz, 120Hz, or some other value. If you use the default your game will naturally pause every frame waiting for the v-sync event. Flipping display buffers to present the new screen to the user will block -- meaning it puts your app to sleep for a moment -- until that time has passed. It serves as a natural way to throttle the game on fast machines.

If you turn v-sync off you will need to take extra steps to ensure you don't accidentally burn out the player's video card or CPU, both of which have happened with badly-developed games.

#1frob

Posted 25 December 2012 - 09:10 PM

It depends.

Many games will leave v-sync on, so flipping buffers will block, which results in a natural capping.

Since you are a beginner in the For Beginner's forum I'll explain in a bit more detail. The video card accumulates all the rendering commands and buffers them. They are not actually shown to the user until the display is swapped. By default, that swap takes place during the v-sync, the time it would take for an older CRT beam to go from the bottom of the screen to the top of the screen. Usually you see that on newer LCDs as 60Hz, 75Hz, 120Hz, or some other value. If you use the default your game will naturally pause every frame waiting for the v-sync event. Flipping display buffers to present the new screen to the user will block -- meaning it puts your app to sleep for a moment -- until that time has passed. It serves as a natural way to throttle the game on fast machines.

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