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#ActualKrohm

Posted 27 December 2012 - 04:20 AM

If "strategy" is "make most optimal use of your resources" then I guess I could point out some real world games I've played with my friends.
Such game needs to meet ALL conditions below:
- turn based
- strategy (in a very broad sense)
- you don't move units on some sort of map to kill other units
There's no killing involved in Adastra, by Bruno Faidutti, albeit there are units to move on a map. I think it's a remarkably balanced game.
The game is based on acquiring resource cards by moving units on planets to mine.
The strategy involves maximizing your score and not giving advantage to other players. There's also a nice "shuffling" action system which allow players to act out-of-order and yes, it is often useful!

Stone age, by Bernd Brunnhofer it's a twist of the same problem. Again, no killing involved. The main difference is that there are really no movement costs (units move just for visual aid), they often have a chance to produce. Resource competition is no more driven by a production card but instead by a limited set of production slots. It's really more complicated than that.

Agricola (already mentioned), by Uwe Rosemberg is quite famous (even cited in XKCD). I guess I'm the only one not liking it as it gives pro players an extreme advantage compared to newcomers. I still have to remember what cards are supposed to be useful, let alone understand how most cards interact with each other!
In a certain sense, Stone Age is a streamlined Agricola, the difference being an extreme amount of emergent complexity, a richer resource set and a scarcer amount of resources. Agricola is a two-phase game:
  • Players choose their advantages. This is basically playing poker, except every card is unique, you have to figure out what to pick up in advance.

  • The game itself.
It is more difficult to understand and has more emergent complexity. I have played it for years and I still have to understand how people can do that in their spare time. To me, it is as fun as solving a 8x14x3 matrix. Or hunting a bug in a dynamically generated shader with dynamically streamed resources...
But I admit it has extreme strategic elements.

#1Krohm

Posted 27 December 2012 - 04:20 AM

If "strategy" is "make most optimal use of your resources" then I guess I could point out some real world games I've played with my friends.

 

Such game needs to meet ALL conditions below:

- turn based

- strategy (in a very broad sense)

- you don't move units on some sort of map to kill other units

There's no killing involved in Adastra, by Bruno Faidutti, albeit there are units to move on a map. I think it's a remarkably balanced game.

The game is based on acquiring resource cards by moving units on planets to mine.

The strategy involves maximizing your score and not giving advantage to other players. There's also a nice "shuffling" action system which allow players to act out-of-order and yes, it is often useful!

 

Stone age, by Bernd Brunnhofer it's a twist of the same problem. Again, no killing involved. The main difference is that there are really no movement costs (units move just for visual aid), they often have a chance to produce. Resource competition is no more driven by a production card but instead by a limited set of production slots. It's really more complicated than that.

 

Agricola, by Uwe Rosemberg is quite famous (even cited in XKCD). I guess I'm the only one not liking it as it gives pro players an extreme advantage compared to newcomers. I still have to remember what cards are supposed to be useful, let alone understand how most cards interact with each other!

In a certain sense, Stone Age is a streamlined Agricola, the difference being an extreme amount of emergent complexity, a richer resource set and a scarcer amount of resources. Agricola is a two-phase game:

  1. Players choose their advantages. This is basically playing poker, except every card is unique, you have to figure out what to pick up in advance.
  2. The game itself.

It is more difficult to understand and has more emergent complexity. I have played it for years and I still have to understand how people can do that in their spare time. To me, it is as fun as solving a 8x14x3 matrix. Or hunting a bug in a dynamically generated shader with dynamically streamed resources...

But I admit it has extreme strategic elements.


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