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#ActualBCullis

Posted 28 December 2012 - 11:24 AM

Edit: wow, that got jumbled into a huge mess of html. Going to try to clean it up here.

You don't have to super-saturate your colors for there to be good contrast. You can have a full range of value with zero saturation (i.e. just ranging from white, through grays, to black). If you picture a color wheel, with neutral gray at the center, and increased saturation (aka "chroma") at the edge, with hue changing around the circle, your value would be a new vertical dimension that turned your color wheel into a color cylinder, pushing the specific hue/chroma combination lighter or darker.

Though your chroma range shrinks as you approach pure white and pure black, so it's not a true cylinder but more of a football (american) shape.

Your skeletons, for example, read much better than the orcs because they stick to the grey range, but the bones are much lighter than the armor. Nothing breaks up the value set of the orcs, they're one continuous dark grey. You could either throw different colors at it (so you get hue contrast and complements) or push the values of the chosen color range (darker shadows, selective highlights, etc).

#1BCullis

Posted 28 December 2012 - 11:23 AM

<blockquote class="ipsBlockquote" data-cid="5014892" data-author="thefriend"><p>I just have trouble with saturated colors. I feel like most of the time they're just too bright. Going to def take a look</p></blockquote><br />You don't have to super-saturate your colors for there to be good contrast. You can have a full range of value with zero saturation (i.e. just ranging from white, through grays, to black). If you picture a color wheel, with neutral gray at the center, and increased saturation (aka "chroma") at the edge, with hue changing around the circle, your value would be a new vertical dimension that turned your color wheel into a color cylinder, pushing the specific hue/chroma combination lighter or darker.<br /><br />Though your chroma range shrinks as you approach pure white and pure black, so it's not a true cylinder but more of a football (american) shape.<br /><br />Your skeletons, for example, read much better than the orcs because they stick to the grey range, but the bones are much lighter than the armor. Nothing breaks up the value set of the orcs, they're one continuous dark grey. You could either throw different colors at it (so you get hue contrast and complements) or push the values of the chosen color range (darker shadows, selective highlights, etc).

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