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#ActualHodgman

Posted 29 December 2012 - 07:48 AM

It wont be around in 5 years. It is not a continuation of C. It is a product from Microsoft and like many of their products before them, they will be dropped once the next newest thing comes out.

It's defined by ECMA and ISO/IEC standards. It's used to make games on Sony, Nintendo, Apple and Google platforms. There is an open-source implementation of the ".NET runtimes" (CLR) for Linux and Mac. All that is out of Microsoft's hands.

Anyone remember J#?

Microsoft's Java knock-off evolved into C# when they started losing too many lawsuits over their attempts to kill Java...

Anyone remember Visual Basic? It used to be as popular as C# is today. And now since they dropped it and then emulated it using .NET, now it is a niche (teaching) language.

The "old" VB stopped evolving in 1998, and was a niche language back then, used for teaching and 'scripting' mainly. It's still supported to some degree, with it's runtime being available on modern OS's...
The latest update to the current incarnation of VB (A.K.A. VB.NET) was this year! It doesn't make sense to say it's "emulated using .NET" -- it's a CLR language, like C#, which means it's compiled to CIL, like C# is, which means it can run on Mono, as above, so it's also usable in areas outside of Microsoft's control.

 

Unlike C#, neither the new or old incarnations of VB are defined by an open-standard, so you're choosing to become dependent on a specific vendor when you choose to use them. Despite this though, Mono does include an open-source, non-Microsoft compiler for modern VB (not the old VB). So, ironically, the new VB that you hate is actually less tied to Microsoft (i.e. more able to survive without their support) than the old one...

 

Anyone remember Microsoft Managed C++? That is the last time I waste effort learning a non standard C++ extension.

It wasn't really a C++ extension (despite being called "Managed Extensions for C++"), it was a (crappy) port of C++ to the CLR.

 

If you wanted to write in a very-C++-style language, but create programs for the CLR platform, then it was a necessary evil at the time. It was very badly designed though, so they got people who knew what they were doing to instead make C++/CLI, which does the same thing, but is better designed. C++/CLI, like C#, is also defined by an ECMA standard, meaning it's out of Microsoft's control. However, AFAIK, no-one else has bothered to make a C++/CLI compiler, for whatever reason.

C++/CX is another stand-alone language, but for people who want a C++-style language and create programs for the WinRT platform.

Personally, yes, I'd avoid all of these, unless you're forced to use those platforms, and have no real choice...


#7Hodgman

Posted 29 December 2012 - 07:48 AM

It wont be around in 5 years. It is not a continuation of C. It is a product from Microsoft and like many of their products before them, they will be dropped once the next newest thing comes out.

It's defined by ECMA and ISO/IEC standards. It's used to make games on Sony, Nintendo, Apple and Google platforms. There is an open-source implementation of the ".NET runtimes" (CLR) for Linux and Mac. All that is out of Microsoft's hands.

Anyone remember J#?

Microsoft's Java knock-off evolved into C# when they started losing too many lawsuits over their attempts to kill Java...

Anyone remember Visual Basic? It used to be as popular as C# is today. And now since they dropped it and then emulated it using .NET, now it is a niche (teaching) language.

The "old" VB stopped evolving in 1998, and was a niche language back then, used for teaching and 'scripting' mainly. It's still supported to some degree, with it's runtime being available on modern OS's...
The latest update to the current incarnation of VB (A.K.A. VB.NET) was this year! It doesn't make sense to say it's "emulated using .NET" -- it's a CLR language, like C#, which means it's compiled to CIL, like C# is, which means it can run on Mono, as above, so it's also usable in areas outside of Microsoft's control.

 

Unlike C#, neither the new or old incarnations of VB are defined by an open-standard, so you're choosing to become dependent on a specific vendor when you choose to use them. Despite this though, Mono does include an open-source, non-Microsoft compiler for modern VB (not the old VB). So, ironically, the new VB that you hate is actually less tied to Microsoft (i.e. more able to survive without their support) than the old one...

Anyone remember Microsoft Managed C++? That is the last time I waste effort learning a non standard C++ extension.

It wasn't really a C++ extension (despite being called "Managed Extensions for C++"), it was a (crappy) port of C++ to the CLR.

If you wanted to write in a very-C++-style language, but create programs for the CLR platform, then it was a necessary evil at the time. It was very badly designed though, so they got people who knew what they were doing to instead make C++/CLI, which does the same thing, but is better designed. C++/CLI, like C#, is also defined by an ECMA standard, meaning it's out of Microsoft's control. However, AFAIK, no-one else has bothered to make a C++/CLI compiler, for whatever reason.

C++/CX is another stand-alone language, but for people who want a C++-style language and create programs for the WinRT platform.

Personally, yes, I'd avoid all of these, unless you're forced to use those platforms, and have no real choice...


#6Hodgman

Posted 29 December 2012 - 07:39 AM

It wont be around in 5 years. It is not a continuation of C. It is a product from Microsoft and like many of their products before them, they will be dropped once the next newest thing comes out.

It's defined by ECMA and ISO/IEC standards. It's used to make games on Sony, Nintendo, Apple and Google platforms. There is an open-source implementation of the ".NET runtimes" (CLR) for Linux and Mac. All that is out of Microsoft's hands.

Anyone remember J#?

Microsoft's Java knock-off evolved into C# when they started losing too many lawsuits over their attempts to kill Java...

Anyone remember Visual Basic? It used to be as popular as C# is today. And now since they dropped it and then emulated it using .NET, now it is a niche (teaching) language.

The "old" VB stopped evolving in 1998, and was a niche language back then, used for teaching and 'scripting' mainly. It's still supported to some degree, with it's runtime being available on modern OS's...
The latest update to the current incarnation of VB (A.K.A. VB.NET) was this year! It doesn't make sense to say it's "emulated using .NET" -- it's a CLR language, like C#, which means it's compiled to CIL, like C# is, which means it can run on Mono, as above, so it's also usable in areas outside of Microsoft's control.

 

Unlike C#, neither the new or old incarnations of VB are defined by an open-standard, so you're choosing to become dependent on a specific vendor when you choose to use them. Despite this though, Mono does include an open-source, non-Microsoft compiler for modern VB (not the old VB). So, ironically, the new VB that you hate is actually less tied to Microsoft (i.e. more able to survive without their support) than the old one...


#5Hodgman

Posted 29 December 2012 - 07:37 AM

It wont be around in 5 years. It is not a continuation of C. It is a product from Microsoft and like many of their products before them, they will be dropped once the next newest thing comes out.

It's defined by ECMA and ISO/IEC standards. It's used to make games on Sony, Nintendo, Apple and Google platforms. There is an open-source implementation of the ".NET runtimes" (CLR) for Linux and Mac. All that is out of Microsoft's hands.

Anyone remember J#?

Microsoft's Java knock-off evolved into C# when they started losing too many lawsuits over their attempts to kill Java...

Anyone remember Visual Basic? It used to be as popular as C# is today. And now since they dropped it and then emulated it using .NET, now it is a niche (teaching) language.

The "old" VB stopped evolving in 1998, and was a niche language back then, used for teaching and 'scripting' mainly. It's still supported to some degree, with it's runtime being available on modern OS's...
The latest update to the current incarnation of VB (A.K.A. VB.NET) was this year! It doesn't make sense to say it's "emulated using .NET" -- it's a CLR language, like C#, which means it's compiled to CIL, like C# is, which means it can run on Mono, as above, so it's also usable in areas outside of Microsoft's control.

However, yes, neither the new or old incarnations of VB are defined by an open-standard, so you're choosing to become dependent on a specific vendor when you choose to use them.


#4Hodgman

Posted 29 December 2012 - 07:34 AM

It wont be around in 5 years. It is not a continuation of C. It is a product from Microsoft and like many of their products before them, they will be dropped once the next newest thing comes out.

It's defined by ECMA and ISO/IEC standards. It's used to make games on Sony, Nintendo, Apple and Google platforms. There is an open-source implementation of the ".NET" runtimes for Linux and Mac.

All that is out of Microsoft's hands.

Anyone remember J#?

Microsoft's Java knock-off evolved into C# when they started losing too many lawsuits over their attempts to kill Java...

 

Anyone remember Visual Basic? It used to be as popular as C# is today. And now since they dropped it and then emulated it using .NET, now it is a niche (teaching) language.

The "old" VB stopped evolving in 1998, and was a niche language back then, used for teaching and 'scripting' mainly. It's still supported to some degree, with it's runtime being available on modern OS's...

The latest update to the current incarnation of VB (A.K.A. VB.NET) was this year! It doesn't make sense to say it's "emulated using .NET" -- it's a CLR language, like C#, which means it's compiled to CIL, like C# is, which means it can run on Mono, as above, so it's also usable in areas outside of Microsoft's control.


#3Hodgman

Posted 29 December 2012 - 07:33 AM

It wont be around in 5 years. It is not a continuation of C. It is a product from Microsoft and like many of their products before them, they will be dropped once the next newest thing comes out.

It's defined by ECMA and ISO/IEC standards. It's used to make games on Sony, Nintendo and Apple platforms. There is an open-source implementation of the ".NET" runtimes for Linux and Mac.

All that is out of Microsoft's hands.

Anyone remember J#?

Microsoft's Java knock-off evolved into C# when they started losing too many lawsuits over their attempts to kill Java...

 

Anyone remember Visual Basic? It used to be as popular as C# is today. And now since they dropped it and then emulated it using .NET, now it is a niche (teaching) language.

The "old" VB stopped evolving in 1998, and was a niche language back then, used for teaching and 'scripting' mainly. It's still supported to some degree, with it's runtime being available on modern OS's...

The latest update to the current incarnation of VB (A.K.A. VB.NET) was this year! It doesn't make sense to say it's "emulated using .NET" -- it's a CLR language, like C#, which means it's compiled to CIL, like C# is, which means it can run on Mono, as above, so it's also usable in areas outside of Microsoft's control.


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