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#ActualTheis_Bane

Posted 31 December 2012 - 12:31 AM

I think one of the main issues with questing in our current incarnation of MMORPGs is the link between questing and the need to gain experience/levels. In WOW, one could theoretically level from 1 to 60/70/80/85 (whatever max is at this point) without ever embarking on a single quest. There are enough monsters of a varied level to provide a constant stream of experience and levels, should you possess the patience to grind, grind, grind your life away.
In truth though, the majority of a character's experience comes from completing quests. Even the experience gained from the monsters killed during a 'kill x amount of ys' quest is paltry in comparison to the amount you get when the quest is done. Add in the randomly useful piece of gear and sum of money rewarded as well, and you suddenly begin to wonder why people look for anything else to do in the game.
It is all tied in together far too tightly, all to support the drive to level up and get better gear. "Gaining experience" quickly replaces the basic reason you started playing in the first place - to "experience the game."
I think we need to work on divorcing experience gain from questing. A player shouldn't be pushed into a series of repetitive, uninteresting quests simply because it provides the swiftest way from level x to level y. The way I see it, while the events encountered while on the quest would naturally provide a character some experience in one form or another, finishing the quest itself should reward said character in any manner other than experience gain. Money, property, reputation, story, more quests...anything but experience. I should want to do quests because of what it brings to my pleasure of playing the game, not so I can do more quests.
In separating the two, we would see the overall design of the MMORPG change dramatically. In order to keep players interested, designers would be forced to create more interesting quests, more worthwhile rewards, and a world worth experiencing.

#2Theis_Bane

Posted 31 December 2012 - 12:30 AM

I think one of the main issues with questing in our current incarnation of MMORPGs is the link between questing and the need to gain experience/levels. In WOW, one could theoretically level from 1 to 60/70/80/85 (whatever max is at this point) without ever embarking on a single quest. There are enough monsters of a varied level to provide a constant stream of experience and levels, should you possess the patience to grind, grind, grind your life away.<br/><br/>In truth though, the majority of a character's experience comes from completing quests. Even the experience gained from the monsters killed during a 'kill x amount of ys' quest is paltry in comparison to the amount you get when the quest is done. Add in the randomly useful piece of gear and sum of money rewarded as well, and you suddenly begin to wonder why people look for anything else to do in the game.<br /><br />It is all tied in together far too tightly, all to support the drive to level up and get better gear. "Gaining experience" quickly replaces the basic reason you started playing in the first place - to "experience the game."<br/><br/>I think we need to work on divorcing experience gain from questing. A player shouldn't be pushed into a series of repetitive, uninteresting quests simply because it provides the swiftest way from level x to level y. The way I see it, while the events encountered while on the quest would naturally provide a character some experience in one form or another, finishing the quest itself should reward said character in any manner other than experience gain. Money, property, reputation, story, more quests...anything but experience. I should want to do quests because of what it brings to my pleasure of playing the game, not so I can do more quests.<br /><br />In separating the two, we would see the overall design of the MMORPG change dramatically. In order to keep players interested, designers would be forced to create more interesting quests, more worthwhile rewards, and a world worth experiencing.

#1Theis_Bane

Posted 31 December 2012 - 12:29 AM

I think one of the main issues with questing in our current incarnation of MMORPGs is the link between questing and the need to gain experience/levels. In WOW, one could theoretically level from 1 to 60/70/80/85 (whatever max is at this point) without ever embarking on a single quest. There are enough monsters of a varied level to provide a constant stream of experience and levels, should you possess the patience to grind, grind, grind your life away.<br /><br />In truth though, the majority of a character's experience comes from completing quests. Even the experience gained from the monsters killed during a 'kill x amount of ys' quest is paltry in comparison to the amount you get when the quest is done. Add in the randomly useful piece of gear and sum of money rewarded as well, and you suddenly begin to wonder why people look for anything else to do in the game.<br /><br />It is all tied in together far too tightly, all to support the drive to level up and get better gear. "Gaining experience" quickly replaces the basic reason you started playing in the first place - to "experience the game."<br /><br />I think we need to work on divorcing experience gain from questing. A player shouldn't be pushed into a series of repetitive, uninteresting quests simply because it provides the swiftest way from level x to level y. The way I see it, while the events encountered while on the quest would naturally provide a character some experience in one form or another, finishing the quest itself should reward said character in any manner other than experience gain. Money, property, reputation, story, more quests...anything but experience. I should want to do quests because of what it brings to my pleasure of playing the game, not so I can do more quests.<br /><br />In separating the two, we would see the overall design of the MMORPG change dramatically. In order to keep players interested, designers would be forced to create more interesting quests, more worthwhile rewards, and a world worth experiencing.

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