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#ActualM4uesviecr

Posted 01 January 2013 - 02:33 PM

Hey Jonah! I listened to your entire demo reel and I have to say that I think your stuff is very good! I am really new to the free-lance composition scene. Like you, I have a lot to learn as as well as many areas to improve on (I, for one, struggle with balance, which I think you do a fantastic job with. To the point that I actually went back through my music to compare!)

I honestly don't have much to add outside of what Moritz did a wonderful job of explaining. As far as compositonal skills, you need not worry. The difficult part is branching out to find other clients. Be professional, be inviting, be cooperative, and be yourself!

As far as knowing when, I never knew. I just did. Many of the first games I composed for were no-budget games. I only recently landed myself a few jobs creating music for games that are actually going to be sold commercially, with a professional flare. I've only recently gotten my feet wet and, even then, I have plenty more soaking to do. I basically went in with each job, and worked as hard as I could. The best that I could. Gave my all and tried to be as understanding and helpful as possible. The only thing I knew was that I wanted to do this (compose music for games), and I was going to work my hardest to make it a possibility.

As far as clientele, it has been a combination of seeking out clients, to a kind word whispered between developers. Moritz's bit on networking is key.The videogame industry isn't big at all, and knowledge about you gets out due to word of mouth. Unless you're big or getting there (like Austin Wintory), your best bet is to find clients. But also take time to get to know developers. Even some in your local area. Go to game conventions, stuff like that. Anything to build relationships.

#1M4uesviecr

Posted 01 January 2013 - 02:31 PM

Hey Jonah! I listened to your entire demo reel and I have to say that I think your stuff is very good! I am really new to the free-lance composition scene. Like you, I have a lot to learn as as well many areas to improve on (I, for one, struggle with balance, which I think you do a fantastic job with. To the point that I actually went back through my music to compare!)

I honestly don't have much to add outside of what Moritz did a wonderful job of explaining. As far as compositonal skills, you need not worry. The difficult part is branching out to find other clients. Be professional, be inviting, be cooperative, and be yourself!

As far as knowing when, I never knew. I just did. Many of the first games I composed for were no-budget games. I only recent have landed myself a few jobs creating music for games that are actually going to be sold commercially, with a professional flare. I've only recently gotten my feet wet, and even then I have plenty more soaking to do. I basically went in with each job, and worked as hard as I could. The best that I could. Gave my all and tried to be as understanding and helpful as possible. The only thing I knew was that I wanted to do it, and I was going to work my hardest to make it a possibility.

As far as clientele, it has been a combination of seeking out clients, to a kind word whispered between developers. Moritz's bit on networking is key. The videogame industry isn't big at all, and word about you gets out due to word of mouth. Unless you're big or getting there (like Austin Wintory), your best bet is to find clients. But also take time to get to know developers. Even some in your local area. GO to game conventions, stuff like that. Anything to build relationships.

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