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#ActualRecantha2

Posted 02 January 2013 - 01:21 AM

Oh, I agree. Slight bit of rambling here:
The whole educational goal aspect of the Pi has been neglected, in my opinion. I fear that the Foundation has missed the boat a bit on this by not doing the promised "educational version". I also think that the lack of a VGA output is a mistake, simply due to the number of VGA monitors schools have that could've been used had the port been added to the board. Leaving that aside, though, schools at the moment are under no obligation to teach programming or computer concepts in a manner in which the Pi would be an essential, so the market is limited to those in ICT who see the Pi and understand what it can do. There's the problem, of course, that schools love to teach students how to use MS Office which, of course (duh), can't be used on the Pi. So, it's not like schools can just buy Pis to replace their PCs. It would have to be in addition to the PCs. Straight away the question is "What's the point of getting the Pi?" At which point the answer becomes a huge burden on teachers to create their own mini-curriculum.

I guess my point in all that is that the Foundation needs to come up with a plan for teachers - the why and the how of Raspberry Pis in education. And I'm not sure they have anyone actively working on that plan in their self-confessed techie group.

That's not to say they do everything wrong, you understand. They're pretty good at getting themselves "out there" and the product known, it's just that they often leave people wondering "Okay, _now_ what do I do?" It's the difference between _saying_ that education is your goal and actually doing something about it.

#2Recantha2

Posted 02 January 2013 - 01:21 AM

Oh, I agree. Slight bit of rambling here:
The whole educational goal aspect of the Pi has been neglected, in my opinion. I fear that the Foundation has missed the boat a bit on this by not doing the promised "educational version". I also think that the lack of a VGA output is a mistake, simply due to the number of VGA monitors schools have that could've been used had the port been added to the board. Leaving that aside, though, schools at the moment are under no obligation to teach programming or computer concepts in a manner in which the Pi would be an essential, so the market is limited to those in ICT who see the Pi and understand what it can do. There's the problem, of course, that schools love to teach students how to use MS Office which, of course (duh), can't be used on the Pi. So, it's not like schools can just buy Pis to replace their PCs. It would have to be in addition to the PCs. Straight away the question is "What's the point of getting the Pi?" At which point the answer becomes a huge burden on teachers to create their own mini-curriculum.

I guess my point in all that is that the Foundation needs to come up with a plan for teachers - the why and the how of Raspberry Pis in education. And I'm not sure they have anyone actively working on that plan in their self-confessed techie group.

That's not to say they do everything wrong, you understand. They're pretty good at getting themselves "out there" and the product known, it's just that they often leave people wondering "Okay, _now_ what do I do?" It's the difference between _saying_ that education is your goal and actually doing something about it.

#1Recantha2

Posted 02 January 2013 - 01:20 AM

Oh, I agree. Slightly rambling:

The whole educational goal aspect of the Pi has been neglected, in my opinion. I fear that the Foundation has missed the boat a bit on this by not doing the promised "educational version". I also think that the lack of a VGA output is a mistake, simply due to the number of VGA monitors schools have that could've been used had the port been added to the board. Leaving that aside, though, schools at the moment are under no obligation to teach programming or computer concepts in a manner in which the Pi would be an essential, so the market is limited to those in ICT who see the Pi and understand what it can do. There's the problem, of course, that schools love to teach students how to use MS Office which, of course (duh), can't be used on the Pi. So, it's not like schools can just buy Pis to replace their PCs. It would have to be in addition to the PCs. Straight away the question is "What's the point of getting the Pi?" At which point the answer becomes a huge burden on teachers to create their own mini-curriculum.

 

I guess my point in all that is that the Foundation needs to come up with a plan for teachers - the why and the how of Raspberry Pis in education. And I'm not sure they have anyone actively working on that plan in their self-confessed techie group.

 

That's not to say they do everything wrong, you understand. They're pretty good at getting themselves "out there" and the product known, it's just that they often leave people wondering "Okay, _now_ what do I do?"


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