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#ActualEddieV223

Posted 02 January 2013 - 04:07 PM

Did it take over a decade to improve C++? Did this annoy the hell out of many people (including me)? Of course, but that is what design-by-committee is about. A design committee always makes any kind of process lengthy and complicated, that's just the way it is. It's not a miracle that someone at the top (1-2 people) dictating what shall be done happens in considerably less time than 40 or 50 board members meeting and discussing and trying to make every single one happy. This doesn't mean that what finally came out of it is necessarily bad, however.


It did take a long time to for this update to happen, from 98 to 2011. However, the future of c++ is amazingly bright, they now have many study groups of experts working on separate pieces of the language. These study groups work on the language and then bring there work back to the commite to be voted on. This is something that c++ has never had, more people are now working on the standard than ever before.


If you want to see exactly what I'm talking about watch this.
http://channel9.msdn.com/Events/Build/2012/2-005

he starts getting into the new standards committe about 22minutes in.

Study groups ( none of these existed before c++11 was released )
concurrency
modules
filesystem
networking
Tx Memory
Numerics
reflection
concepts
ranges
Feature Test
Databases ( being formed )

And also the standard agreed on a new time table for releases

ge3qu.jpg

#5EddieV223

Posted 02 January 2013 - 04:07 PM

Did it take over a decade to improve C++? Did this annoy the hell out of many people (including me)? Of course, but that is what design-by-committee is about. A design committee always makes any kind of process lengthy and complicated, that's just the way it is. It's not a miracle that someone at the top (1-2 people) dictating what shall be done happens in considerably less time than 40 or 50 board members meeting and discussing and trying to make every single one happy. This doesn't mean that what finally came out of it is necessarily bad, however.


It did take a long time to for this update to happen, from 98 to 2011. However, the future of c++ is amazingly bright, they now have many study groups of experts working on separate pieces of the language. These study groups work on the language and then bring there work back to the commite to be voted on. This is something that c++ has never had, more people are now working on the standard than ever before.


If you want to see exactly what I'm talking about watch this.
http://channel9.msdn.com/Events/Build/2012/2-005

he starts getting into the new standards committe about 22minutes in.

Study groups ( none of these existed before c++11 was released )
concurrency
modules
filesystem
networking
Tx Memory
Numerics
reflection
concepts
ranges
Feature Test
Databases ( being formed )

And also the standard agreed on a new time table for releases

ge3qu.jpg

#4EddieV223

Posted 02 January 2013 - 03:56 PM

Did it take over a decade to improve C++? Did this annoy the hell out of many people (including me)? Of course, but that is what design-by-committee is about. A design committee always makes any kind of process lengthy and complicated, that's just the way it is. It's not a miracle that someone at the top (1-2 people) dictating what shall be done happens in considerably less time than 40 or 50 board members meeting and discussing and trying to make every single one happy. This doesn't mean that what finally came out of it is necessarily bad, however.
 

It did take a long time to for this update to happen, from 98 to 2011. However, the future of c++ is amazingly bright, they now have many study groups of experts working on separate pieces of the language. These study groups work on the language and then bring there work back to the commite to be voted on. This is something that c++ has never had, more people are now working on the standard than ever before.


If you want to see exactly what I'm talking about watch this.
http://channel9.msdn.com/Events/Build/2012/2-005

he starts getting into the new standards committe about 22minutes in.

Study groups ( none of these existed before c++11 was released )
concurrency
modules
filesystem
networking
Tx Memory
Numerics
reflection
concepts
ranges
Feature Test
Databases ( being formed )

#3EddieV223

Posted 02 January 2013 - 03:56 PM


Did it take over a decade to improve C++? Did this annoy the hell out of many people (including me)? Of course, but that is what design-by-committee is about. A design committee always makes any kind of process lengthy and complicated, that's just the way it is. It's not a miracle that someone at the top (1-2 people) dictating what shall be done happens in considerably less time than 40 or 50 board members meeting and discussing and trying to make every single one happy. This doesn't mean that what finally came out of it is necessarily bad, however.
 


It did take a long time to for this update to happen, from 98 to 2011. However, the future of c++ is amazingly bright, they now have many study groups of experts working on separate pieces of the language. These study groups work on the language and then bring there work back to the commite to be voted on. This is something that c++ has never had, more people are now working on the standard than ever before.


If you want to see exactly what I'm talking about watch this.
http://channel9.msdn.com/Events/Build/2012/2-005

he starts getting into the new standards committe about 22minutes in.

Study groups ( none of these existed before c++11 was released )
concurrency
modules
filesystem
networking
Tx Memory
Numerics
reflection
concepts
ranges
Feature Test
Databases ( being formed )



#2EddieV223

Posted 02 January 2013 - 03:55 PM


Did it take over a decade to improve C++? Did this annoy the hell out of many people (including me)? Of course, but that is what design-by-committee is about. A design committee always makes any kind of process lengthy and complicated, that's just the way it is. It's not a miracle that someone at the top (1-2 people) dictating what shall be done happens in considerably less time than 40 or 50 board members meeting and discussing and trying to make every single one happy. This doesn't mean that what finally came out of it is necessarily bad, however.
 


It did take a long time to for this update to happen, from 98 to 2011. However, the future of c++ is amazingly bright, they now have many study groups of experts working on separate pieces of the language. These study groups work on the language and then bring there work back to the commite to be voted on. This is something that c++ has never had, more people are now working on the standard than ever before.



If you want to see exactly what I'm talking about watch this.
http://channel9.msdn.com/Events/Build/2012/2-005

he starts getting into the new standards committe about 22minutes in.

Study groups ( none of these existed before c++11 was released )
concurrency
modules
filesystem
networking
Tx Memory
Numerics
reflection
concepts
ranges
Feature Test
Databases ( being formed )

#1EddieV223

Posted 02 January 2013 - 03:55 PM


Did it take over a decade to improve C++? Did this annoy the hell out of many people (including me)? Of course, but that is what design-by-committee is about. A design committee always makes any kind of process lengthy and complicated, that's just the way it is. It's not a miracle that someone at the top (1-2 people) dictating what shall be done happens in considerably less time than 40 or 50 board members meeting and discussing and trying to make every single one happy. This doesn't mean that what finally came out of it is necessarily bad, however.
 


It did take a long time to for this update to happen, from 98 to 2011. However, the future of c++ is amazingly bright, they now have many study groups of experts working on separate pieces of the language. These study groups work on the language and then bring there work back to the commite to be voted on. This is something that c++ has never had, more people are now working on the standard than ever before.

If you want to see exactly what I'm talking about watch this.
http://channel9.msdn.com/Events/Build/2012/2-005

he starts getting into the new standards committe about 22minutes in.

Study groups ( none of these existed before c++11 was released )
concurrency
modules
filesystem
networking
Tx Memory
Numerics
reflection
concepts
ranges
Feature Test
Databases ( being formed )



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