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#ActualBacterius

Posted 03 January 2013 - 06:55 AM

This sound interesting and nothing I really thought about. I always thought that the only thing the field of view does is that it works as a scaling factor (common example would be the perspective projection matrix used in OpenGL etc.). A smaller fov, from what I understand, would mean that my objects get scaled bigger which would be something similar to zooming in with a camera. How does this affect the depth perception of the scene?

 

 

I'm not sure how to explain it convincingly, though it does. Here is a rather striking example (higher focal length = lower field of view). Perhaps the easiest way to think of it is to realize that depth is also scaled along with the width and height, which makes it more difficult to evaluate distance based on perspective. At a very small field of view, everything seems to be at the same depth. Another way of thinking of it, is that if a lower field of view is just "zooming in" on a higher field of view picture, then everything in the zoomed-in image is closer to the vanishing point (just by virtue of zooming in, as for ordinary perspective projection the vanishing point is just the center of the image) which also reduces effective depth perception..


#1Bacterius

Posted 03 January 2013 - 06:50 AM

This sound interesting and nothing I really thought about. I always thought that the only thing the field of view does is that it works as a scaling factor (common example would be the perspective projection matrix used in OpenGL etc.). A smaller fov, from what I understand, would mean that my objects get scaled bigger which would be something similar to zooming in with a camera. How does this affect the depth perception of the scene?

 

I'm not sure how to explain it convincingly, though it does. Here is a rather striking example (higher focal length = lower field of view). Perhaps the easiest way to think of it is to realize that depth is also scaled along with the width and height, which makes it more difficult to evaluate distance based on perspective. At a very small field of view, everything seems to be at the same depth. Another way of thinking of it, is that if a lower field of view is just "zooming in" on a higher field of view picture, then everything in the zoomed-in image is closer to the vanishing point (just by virtue of zooming in) which also reduces effective depth perception..


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