Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account


#Actualbassy

Posted 03 January 2013 - 01:52 PM

I was gonna write something here about learning languages:

 

However you're not interested in learning a language.

 

Don't think language, think end product.

 

The problem is that you can't decide on a language to write for something as banal and commonplace as a game without having an idea what sort of coder you are.

 

So my advice to you I guess is to stop writing your terrible game, and just go learn how to program something simple like an rpg. Pick a couple languages, see which you like better, what annoys you and what sticks. Programming can be something of an art and style, a way of thinking. When I first started the so called "easy" languages annoyed the hell out of me. Bad programs, written by lazy people, with terrible documentation, and even poorer rules making me just want to puch whatever idiot thought that having no strict type system was a good thing. Clean, structured languages are actually great for a beginner, because it allows you (or at least me) to 'connect the dots' between parts more easily. I think a lot of 'artsy' people get annoyed by structure though, and then sing the praises of languages that are more freeform because they think better that way.

 

After you've programmed for a while, the language design choices basically don't matter anymore, you just learn to program in your own way and force whatever stupidity the local language is trying to shove down your throat to go away.


#2bassy

Posted 03 January 2013 - 01:52 PM

I was gonna write something here about learning languages:

 

However you're not interested in learning a language.

 

Don't think language, think end product.

 

The problem is that you can't decide on a language to write for something as banal and commonplace as a game without having an idea what sort of coder you are.

 

So my advice to you I guess is to stop writing your terrible game, and just go learn how to program something simple like an rpg. Pick a couple languages, see which you like better, what annoys you and what sticks. Programming can be something of an art and style, a way of thinking. When I first started the so called "easy" languages annoyed the hell out of me. Bad programs, written by lazy people, with terrible documentation, and even poorer rules making me just want to puch whatever idiot thought that having no strict type system was a good thing. Clean, structured languages are actually great for a beginner, because it allows you (or at least me) to 'connect the dots' between parts more easily. I think a lot of 'artsy' people get annoyed by structure though, and then sing the praises of languages that are more freeform because they think better that way.

 

After you've programmed for a while, the language design choices basically don't matter anymore, you just learn to program in your own way and force whatever stupidity the local language is trying to shove down your throat to go away.


#1bassy

Posted 03 January 2013 - 01:51 PM

I was gonna write something here about learning languages:

 

However you're not interested in learning a language.

 

Don't think language, think end product.

 

The problem is that you can't decide on a language to write for something as banal and commonplace as a game without having an idea what sort of coder you are.

 

So my advice to you I guess is to stop writing your terrible game, and just go learn how to program something simple like an rpg. Pick a couple languages, see which you like better, what annoys you and what sticks. Programming can be something of an art and style, a way of thinking. When I first started the so called "easy" languages annoyed the hell out of me. Bad programs, written by lazy people, with terrible documentation, and even poorer rules making me just want to puch whatever idiot thought that having no strict type system was a good thing. Clean, structured languages are actually great for a beginner, because it allows you (or at least me) to 'connect the dots' between parts more easily. I think a lot of 'artsy' people get annoyed by structure though, and then sing the praises of languages that are more freeform because they think better that way.

 

After you've programmed for a while, the language design choices basically don't matter anymore, you just learn to program in your own way and force whatever stupidity the local language is trying to shove down your throat to go away.


PARTNERS