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#ActualBinaryPhysics

Posted 03 January 2013 - 05:34 PM

From what I understand you're wanting to have batch files execute based on git events such as post commit and pre commit?
You're absolutely right. Technically it was on the receive of information from a push but its the same procedure in a very broad sense.

I have a batch file called test.bat in .git/hooks/ and within post-commit I replaced ": nothing" with ./git/hooks/test.bat
I'm implying from this that it's not possible to write batch statements directly into the hook file like I was originally trying to do?

By using a pooling based approach, you could set a silence time, and only trigger a build when there wasn't any commit activity N seconds since the last commit.
I was kinda against this because its a waste. Not go on and sound like I'm worried about how my server uses every single processor cycle but I was concerned with the issue of build with nothing new to build.

Another thing to consider is that those hooks are meant to very fast operations. I don't know the internals of git, but a time consuming operation running on the commit's hook could lock the repository for the time of its execution.
I had read about blocks. I'm not concerned with the result successfully building at this stage (I was simply planning to have the log from MSBuild be remotely readable).

Failing that I was thinking about figuring out a method of running the build externally form the batch and just returning quickly (like making use of START without the wait command).

try Hudson. It runs git and other scripts. It even sends emails with build status and stuff.
Hm. I didn't really want to use a larger, external application for building. Really the whole point of the project is to learn stuff through Wikipedia, the Internet, and stumbling blindly around. I'm completely happy to reinvent the wheel on a small scale for my own education (obviously I'm not planning to write an entire integration system like Jenkins or Hudson).

#3BinaryPhysics

Posted 03 January 2013 - 05:34 PM

From what I understand you're wanting to have batch files execute based on git events such as post commit and pre commit?
You're absolutely right. Technically it was on the receive of information from a push but its the same procedure in a very broad sense.

I have a batch file called test.bat in .git/hooks/ and within post-commit I replaced ": nothing" with ./git/hooks/test.bat
I'm implying from this that it's not possible to write batch statements directly into the hook file like I was originally trying to do?

By using a pooling based approach, you could set a silence time, and only trigger a build when there wasn't any commit activity N seconds since the last commit.
I was kinda against this because its a waste. Not go on and sound like I'm worried about how my server uses every single processor cycle but I was concerned with the issue of build with nothing new to build.

Another thing to consider is that those hooks are meant to very fast operations. I don't know the internals of git, but a time consuming operation running on the commit's hook could lock the repository for the time of its execution.
I had read about blocks. I'm not concerned with the result successfully building at this stage (I was simply planning to have the log from MSBuild be remotely readable).

Failing that I was thinking about figuring out a method of running the build externally form the batch and just returning quickly (like making use of START without the wait command).

try Hudson. It runs git and other scripts. It even sends emails with build status and stuff.
Hm. I didn't really want to use a larger, external application for building. Really the whole point of the project is to learn stuff through Wikipedia, the Internet, and stumbling blindly around. I'm completely happy to reinvent the wheel on a small scale for my own education (obviously I'm not planning to write an entire integration system like Jenkins or Hudson).

#2BinaryPhysics

Posted 03 January 2013 - 05:33 PM

From what I understand you're wanting to have batch files execute based on git events such as post commit and pre commit?

You're absolutely right. Technically it was on the receive of information from a push but its the same procedure in a very broad sense.

 

 

 

I have a batch file called test.bat in .git/hooks/ and within post-commit I replaced ": nothing" with ./git/hooks/test.bat

I'm implying from this that it's not possible to write batch statements directly into the hook file like I was originally trying to do?

 

By using a pooling based approach, you could set a silence time, and only trigger a build when there wasn't any commit activity N seconds since the last commit.

I was kinda against this because its a waste. Not go on and sound like I'm worried about how my server uses every single processor cycle but I was concerned with the issue of build with nothing new to build.

 

 

Another thing to consider is that those hooks are meant to very fast operations. I don't know the internals of git, but a time consuming operation running on the commit's hook could lock the repository for the time of its execution.

I had read about blocks. I'm not concerned with the result successfully building at this stage (I was simply planning to have the log from MSBuild be remotely readable).

 

Failing that I was thinking about figuring out a method of running the build externally form the batch and just returning quickly (like making use of START without the wait command).

 

try Hudson. It runs git and other scripts. It even sends emails with build status and stuff.

Hm. I didn't really want to use a larger, external application for building. Really the whole point of the project is to learn stuff through Wikipedia, the Internet, and stumbling blindly around. I'm completely happy to reinvent the wheel on a small scale for my own education (obviously I'm not planning to write an entire integration system like Jenkins or Hudson).


#1BinaryPhysics

Posted 03 January 2013 - 05:26 PM

From what I understand you're wanting to have batch files execute based on git events such as post commit and pre commit?

You're absolutely right. Technically it was on the receive of information from a push but its the same procedure in a very broad sense.

 

I have a batch file called test.bat in .git/hooks/ and within post-commit I replaced ": nothing" with ./git/hooks/test.bat

I'm implying from this that it's not possible to write batch statements directly into the hook file like I was originally trying to do?


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