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#ActualKhatharr

Posted 07 January 2013 - 02:58 AM

C# and C++ are not very similar in their use. Don't be deceived by evil market-objective driven naming schemes. C# is more similar to Java than C++.

That C++ book Magnus recommends looks like the right type. I'm a little wary that it 'tacks on' the C++11 changes as a final chapter instead of just integrating them into the text, but it looks like you can get it for $30 or less and it may be useful to you to clearly see the difference between C++11 and earlier versions, since not everyone is updated yet. Mainly I'd point out that books in that format usually have 'cheat-sheets' that list things out in an easy-to-reference format which can be useful long after you've learned the core language concepts. If all else fails the index of the book can be used to look up concepts, so try to get the ebook.

That being said, there are online references for C++ that get updated when things change, so if you struggle with textbook-style books then shoot for something a bit more colorful to get you started (more colors and exciting pictures on the front page generally mean it's easier to read whereas a textbook-style cover usually means that it systematically covers everything in detail).

That DX book you've got there looks like it may be at about the level you're looking for. Personally I'd poke around half-price-books or whatever you have in your area to see if I could spend something closer to $10 or $20 rather than $60. That kind of book should be very helpful in moving you into the DirectX world, but once you're there you're probably going to look back at it maybe five times and then it's a $60 paperweight. Poke around used bookstores online and if all else fails and you really want that book then try to get it in ebook format. (Not saying it's a bad book or that it's not worth $60. I'm just saying that if you can get something that's more or less the same for less cash then don't waste your bills on impulse shopping.)

For DirectX you won't need a reference book though (a tutorial book, sure, but not a reference book), since it's documented both on MSDN and in the .chm files that are installed along with it (which are a copy of the MSDN docs).

#1Khatharr

Posted 07 January 2013 - 02:58 AM

C# and C++ are not very similar in their use. Don't be deceived by evil market-objective driven naming schemes. C# is more similar to Java than C++.<br /><br />That C++ book Magnus recommends looks like the right type. I'm a little wary that it 'tacks on' the C++11 changes as a final chapter instead of just integrating them into the text, but it looks like you can get it for $30 or less and it may be useful to you to clearly see the difference between C++11 and earlier versions, since not everyone is updated yet. Mainly I'd point out that books in that format usually have 'cheat-sheets' that list things out in an easy-to-reference format which can be useful long after you've learned the core language concepts. If all else fails the index of the book can be used to look up concepts, so try to get the ebook.<br /><br />That being said, there are online references for C++ that get updated when things change, so if you struggle with textbook-style books then shoot for something a bit more colorful to get you started (more colors and exciting pictures on the front page generally mean it's easier to read whereas a textbook-style cover usually means that it systematically covers everything in detail).<br /><br />That DX book you've got there looks like it may be at about the level you're looking for. Personally I'd poke around half-price-books or whatever you have in your area to see if I could spend something closer to $10 or $20 rather than $60. That kind of book should be very helpful in moving you into the DirectX world, but once you're there you're probably going to look back at it maybe five times and then it's a $60 paperweight. Poke around used bookstores online and if all else fails and you really want that book then try to get it in ebook format. (Not saying it's a bad book or that it's not worth $60. I'm just saying that if you can get something that's more or less the same for less cash then don't waste your bills on impulse shopping.)<br /><br />For DirectX you don't need a reference book though, since it's documented both on MSDN and in the chm files that are installed along with it (which are a copy of the MSDN docs).

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