Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

#Actualmast4as

Posted 07 January 2013 - 03:57 PM

Are you talking about whether drawing your mesh if it's contained in the frustum (or straddling it). Generally checking if the object's bounding box is completely outside the frustum is already a good start and will certainly provide some level of optimisation. You might gain little from implementing a more complex intersection routine than that. However it all depends of the complexity of the geometry contained in the bbox. For instance if you render a terrain, a large part of the terrain might be outside the frustum but if it's part of a single mesh then you don't have a choice to discard the invisible bits. You need to be sure for large meshes that they are split into smaller bits (of reasonable size) organised eventually as a hierarchy, and then you can easily discard the individual pieces which are outside the frustum. If you choose this strategy, a lot of the objects will be culled and the drawing objects straddling on the frustrum's boundaries is probably okay...


#4mast4as

Posted 07 January 2013 - 03:56 PM

Are you talking about whether drawing your mesh if it's contained in the frustum (or straddling it). Generally checking if the object's bounding box is completely outside the frustum is already a good start and will certainly provide some level of optimisation. You might gain little from implementing a more complex intersection routine than that. However it all depends of the complexity of the geometry contained in the bbox. For instance if you render a terrain, a large part of the terrain might be outside the frustum but if it's part of a single mesh then you don't have a choice to discard the invisible bits. You need to be sure for large meshes that they are split into smaller bits (of reasonable size) organised eventually as a hierarchy, and then discard individual bits which are outside the frustum. If you choose this strategy, drawing objects straddling on the frustrum's boundaries is probably okay...

#3mast4as

Posted 07 January 2013 - 03:56 PM

Are you talking about whether drawing your mesh if it's contained in the frustum (or straddling it). Generally checking if the object's bounding box is completely outside the frustum is already a good start and will certainly provide some level of optimisation. You might gain little from implementing a more complex intersection routine than that. However it all depends of the complexity of the geometry contained in the bbox. For instance if you render a terrain, a large part of the terrain might be outside the frustum but if it's part of a single mesh then you don't have a choice to discard the invisible bits. You need to be sure for large meshes that they are split into smaller bits (of reasonable size) organised eventually as a hierarchy, and then discard individual bits which are outside the frustum. If you choose this strategy, drawing objects straddling on the frustrum's boundaries is probably okay...

#2mast4as

Posted 07 January 2013 - 03:56 PM

Are you talking about whether drawing your mesh if it's contained in the frustum (or straddling it). Generally checking if the object's bounding box is completely outside the frustum is already a good start and will certainly provide some level of optimisation. You might gain little from implementing a more complex intersection routine than that. However it all depends of the complexity of the geometry contained in the bbox. For instance if you render a terrain, a large part of the terrain might be outside the frustum but if it's part of a single mesh then you don't have a choice to discard the invisible bits. You need to be sure for large meshes that they are split into smaller bits (of reasonable size) organised eventually as a hierarchy, and then discard individual bits which are outside the frustum. If you choose this strategy, drawing objects straddling on the frustrum's boundaries is probably okay...

#1mast4as

Posted 07 January 2013 - 03:55 PM

Are you talking about whether drawing your mesh if it's contained in the frustum (or straddling it). Generally checking if the object's bounding box is completely outside the frustum is already a good start and will certainly provide some level of optimisation. You might gain little from implementing a more complex intersection routine than that. However it all depends of the complexity of the geometry contained in the bbox. For instance if you render a terrain, a large part of the terrain might be outside the frustum but if its part of a single mesh then you don't have a choice to discard the invisible bits. You need to be sure for large meshes that they are split into smaller bits (of reasonable size) organised eventually as a hierarchy, and then discard individual bits which are outside the frustum. If you choose this strategy, drawing objects straddling on the frustrum's boundaries is probably okay...


PARTNERS