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FREE SOFTWARE GIVEAWAY

We have 4 x Pro Licences (valued at $59 each) for 2d modular animation software Spriter to give away in this Thursday's GDNet Direct email newsletter.


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#Actualsnugsound

Posted 08 January 2013 - 01:34 PM

I already did something like that, but I want to jump into actual programming instead of using pre-created programs. I used to create mods for Warcraft III but I stopped, also learning how to build games from 0 not from 10% is more valuable, since you will know all the structure and it is more valuable in general!


I suppose it depends what you consider "value". If you want to get a job in the industry some day then you will likely be working with an existing engine, unless you get a job on a tools or engine team, in which case you wouldn't be working directly on "games" per se. (I'm generalizing, mind you)

If you want to do things at lower level then I would suggest learning Direct3D and/or OpenGL, as well as an audio library like DirectSound or FMod. Maybe a Physics library like Bullet, too, depending on what you're trying to do.

For simple 2D games it's not too hard to wire something together using a combination of low-level libraries, though it can get pretty complicated once you get into 3D stuff (read: I hope you like math biggrin.png)


#1snugsound

Posted 08 January 2013 - 01:33 PM

I already did something like that, but I want to jump into actual programming instead of using pre-created programs. I used to create mods for Warcraft III but I stopped, also learning how to build games from 0 not from 10% is more valuable, since you will know all the structure and it is more valuable in general!


I suppose it depends what you consider "value". If you want to get a job in the industry some day then you will likely be working with an existing engine, unless you get a job on a tools or engine team, in which case you wouldn't be working directly on "games" per se. (I'm generalizing, mind you)

If you want to do things at lower level then I would suggest learning Direct3D and/or OpenGL, as well as an audio library like DirectSound or FMod. Maybe a Physics library like Bullet, too, depending on what you're trying to do.

For simple 2D games it's not too hard to wire something together using a combination of low-level libraries, though it can get pretty complicated once you get into 3D stuff (read: I hope you like math ;))


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