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#Actualsamoth

Posted 09 January 2013 - 09:22 AM

The real problem with a SSD breaking is not that it's breaking, though. Nor that your data is gone. Someone who doesn't do backups deserves to lose his data, there's really not much more to say to it than that.

The real problem is the exact same one as with a harddisk: You cannot get replacement.

While you can of course (and will) get a new disk from the manufacturer within your warranty term (5 years in the case of Vertex4 drives), you need to hand in your broken device in exchange. Which includes all data on it. Seeing how this may include data that you do not want give to any random person just that easily, it means that you effectively have no warranty.

I'm not even saying that some guy at Intel, Crucial, or OCZ might want to sniff on your data (though quite possibly, why not?). But chances are that the manufacturer will for example replace the broken controller and give your harddisk to the next customer as a replacement for another broken disk (assuming it is within some reasonable limit of write cycles). They'd probably format it (but can you be sure?), but what does that really mean on a device that reallocates sectors as a standard procedure.

SSDs usually have 128-bit AES encryption nowadays, but that is good for nothing security-wise, because they key is hardcoded. It's merely a method of randomizing data to make a wear-levelling more effective, and a deliberately misleading marketing beacon. Someone else plugging a cable to your (repaired) disk can read all your data just fine. Including your phone contacts, your emails, and your browser passwords.

#1samoth

Posted 09 January 2013 - 09:20 AM

The real problem with a SSD breaking is not that it's breaking, though. Nor that your data is gone. Someone who doesn't do backups deserves to lose his data, there's really not much more to say to it than that.

 

The real problem is the exact same one as with a harddisk: You cannot get replacement.

 

While you can of course (and will) get a new disk from the manufacturer within your warranty term (5 years in the case of Vertex4 drives), you need to hand in your broken device in exchange. Which includes all data on it. Seeing how this may include data that you do not want give to any random person just that easily, it means that you effectively have no warranty.

 

I'm not even saying that some guy at Intel, Crucial, or OCZ might want to sniff on your data (though quite possibly, why not?). But chances are that the manufacturer will for example replace the broken controller and give your harddisk to the next customer as a replacement for another broken disk (assuming it is within some reasonable limit of write cycles). They'd probably format it, but what does that really mean on a device that reallocates sectors as a standard procedure.

 

SSDs are usually have 128-bit AES encryption, but that is good for nothing security-wise, because they key is hardcoded. It's merely a method of randomizing data to make a wear-levelling more effective, and a deliberately misleading marketing beacon. Someone else plugging a cable to your (repaired) disk can read all your data just fine. Including your phone contacts, your emails, and your browser passwords.


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