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FREE SOFTWARE GIVEAWAY

We have 4 x Pro Licences (valued at $59 each) for 2d modular animation software Spriter to give away in this Thursday's GDNet Direct email newsletter.


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#Actualdeekr

Posted 10 January 2013 - 07:16 PM

I'm a little surprised by this thread.

 

OP, honestly, just as long as you have fun with what you decide, I think you made the right choice. I still think c/c++ in a VM sounds like a lot of fun, though.

 

However, there are tons of roads you could go down and I don't think they'll damage you in some irreparable way. Just my opinion, of course. For more examples, you could do c# and play with unity. You could get scheme and work along with the MIT book. You could start with python, do some web stuff or work with some game libs.

 

Also keep in mind that if you go to college for this stuff, they'll typically have you do things similar to the above. Get a Unix account and start playing with your environment and c. The scheme thing was Berkeley's first course in cs. I'd be surprised if there were no game programs out there taking advantage of unity. If OP is worried about what people are advising, go look at some uni cs web pages. They educate people for a living and have been doing it for years.

 

(edit: fix tablet post)


#1deekr

Posted 09 January 2013 - 10:21 PM

I'm a little surprised by this thread. OP, honestly, just as long as you have fun with what you decide, I think you made the right choice. I still think c/c++ in a VM sounds like a lot of fun, though. However, there's tons of roads you could go down and I don't think they'll damage you in some irreparable way. Just my opinion, of course. For more examples, you could do c# and play with unity. You could get scheme and work along with the MIT book. You could start with python, do some web stuff or work with some game libs. Also keep in mind that if you go to college for this stuff, they'll typically have you do things similar to the above. Get a Unix account and start playing with your environment and c. The scheme thing was Berkeley's first course in cs. I'd be surprised if there were no game programs out there taking advantage of unity. If OP is worried about what people are advising, go look at some uni cs web pages. They educate people for a living and have been doing it for years.

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