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#ActualBluefirehawk

Posted 13 January 2013 - 04:00 AM

That's why I think the game genres are wrong, you don't categorise movies by the camera ("closeup of two people kissing"). The reason why you enjoy portal is a whole different one than why you play Call of Duty even though they are considered to be in the same genre.

So how do you make a game engaging? That's a broad enough question to only get broad answers and I am not sure I even have those.

My take on it would be first to decide about the main reason why people play the game. CO-Op experience, story telling, competition, challenge, exploration...
Then I would invest a lot of time in the underlying theme of the game. With what question should the player be left after he finished the game, what feelings should he explore while playing?

#3Bluefirehawk

Posted 13 January 2013 - 03:59 AM

That's why I think the game genres are wrong, you don't categorise movies by the camera ("closeup of two people kissing"). The reason why you enjoy portal is a whole different one than why you play Call of Duty even though they are considered to be in the same genre.

So how do you make a game engaging? That's a broad enough question to only get broad answers and I am not sure I even have those.

My take on it would be first to decide about the main reason why people play the game. CO-Op experience, story telling, competition, challenge...
Then I would invest a lot of time in the underlying theme of the game. With what question should the player be left after he finished the game, what feelings should he explore while playing?

#2Bluefirehawk

Posted 13 January 2013 - 03:58 AM

That's why I think the game genres are wrong, you don't categorise movies by the camera ("closeup of two people kissing"). The reason why you enjoy portal is a whole different one than why you play Call of Duty even though they are considered to be in the same genre.

So how do you make a game engaging? That's a broad enough question to only get broad answers and I am not sure I even have those.

My take on it would be first to decide about the main reason why people play the game. CO-Op experience, story telling, competition, challenge...
Then I would invest a lot of time in the underlying theme of the game. With what question should the player be left after he finished the game, what feelings should he explore while playing?

#1Bluefirehawk

Posted 13 January 2013 - 03:58 AM

That's why I think the game genres are wrong, you don't categorise movies by the camera ("closeup of two people kissing"). The reason why you enjoy portal is a whole different one than why you play Call of Duty even though they are considered to be in the same genre.

 

So how do you make a game engaging? That's a broad enough question to only get broad answers and I am not sure I even have those.

 

My take on it would be first to decide about the main reason why people play the game. CO-Op experience, story telling, competition, challenge...

Then I would invest a lot of time in the underlying theme of the game. With what question should the player be left after he finished the game, what feelings should he explore?


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