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#ActualSimonForsman

Posted 13 January 2013 - 04:06 PM

<blockquote class="ipsBlockquote" data-author="Dan Mayor" data-cid="5021195"><p>Your question is a bit to vague without prior knowledge of what you are doing. The immediate guess is that you could be loading resources off the server which take transmission time and that could be causing your lag (as locally it would be reading near instantly from disk). It could be a particular browser's implementation of Java that is causing the problem (not quite as likely as Java is Java, it runs in the JRE the difference with browsers is that the rendering / input hooks are routed through browser bindings as opposed to direct control).<br /> <br />I'm sorry it's not a real answer but you will need to do some debugging of your own and find out what is actually causing the lag. The easiest way I can think of is to create some logging system that you can record millisecond start and finish times of everything near the slow down. Compare these start and finish times (giving you an idea of how long something takes) between online and offline versions and this should give you an incite to what is actually taking longer and causing the lag.<br /> <br />On a bit of a side note I should warn you that many people refuse to run java applets. There was actually a recent "smear campaign" of sorts launched by Fox and NPR that warn's computer users to never trust Java applets as they expose security vulnerabilities that can lead to identity theft. Although this is 100% true and has always been the case, trusting known providers of applets is ok to do. The problem is your average web user won't trust you, and now that the mighty media has announced "Java is bad" we will see even less people actually allowing java applets to run.<br /> <br />My point? You'r going to want to ditch your online java applet idea as it severely limits your potential audience. Unless this is simply something you want for you and your friends you are shooting yourself in the foot proceeding down a path that we know most people won't accept and now even more will refuse. If it's too late or this game simply can not be converted to either HTML 5 / Javascript or stand alone Java app you will want to adapt your design to allow the user to download and run the applet offline, however many browsers even while offline will still warn the user (stopping them from playing) that the applet shouldn't be trusted.<br /> <br />Sources:<br /> <a data-cke-saved-href="http://fox8.com/2013/01/11/homeland-security-warning-to-computer-users/" href="http://fox8.com/2013/01/11/homeland-security-warning-to-computer-users/">http://fox8.com/2013/01/11/homeland-security-warning-to-computer-users/</a><br /> <a data-cke-saved-href="http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2013/01/11/169156325/computer-users-should-disable-java-7-due-to-security-flaw-experts-say" href="http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2013/01/11/169156325/computer-users-should-disable-java-7-due-to-security-flaw-experts-say">http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2013/01/11/169156325/computer-users-should-disable-java-7-due-to-security-flaw-experts-say</a><br /> <a data-cke-saved-href="http://blogs.kqed.org/newsfix/2013/01/11/experts-warn-users-to-disable-widely-used-java-software/" href="http://blogs.kqed.org/newsfix/2013/01/11/experts-warn-users-to-disable-widely-used-java-software/">http://blogs.kqed.org/newsfix/2013/01/11/experts-warn-users-to-disable-widely-used-java-software/</a><br /><br /></p></blockquote>


Currently there is a known and not yet fixed security hole with Java applets so i wouldn't call it a smear campaign, it is very sound advice to deactivate your java browser plugins until it is fixed since hackers are exploiting it very activily at the moment(and often using legitimate sites to do so). I belive both Chrome and Firefox are blacklisting the Java plugin right now (so it is disabled by default).

Once the bug is fixed it will be reasonably safe to reactivate it. (The same goes for all browser plugins, if a serious security hole is found you should disable the plugin until it is fixed since website security tends to be crap and you never know if the site your visiting is safe)

#1SimonForsman

Posted 13 January 2013 - 04:06 PM

<blockquote class="ipsBlockquote" data-author="Dan Mayor" data-cid="5021195"><p>Your question is a bit to vague without prior knowledge of what you are doing. &nbsp;The immediate guess is that you could be loading resources off the server which take transmission time and that could be causing your lag (as locally it would be reading near instantly from disk). &nbsp;It could be a particular browser's implementation of Java that is causing the problem (not quite as likely as Java is Java, it runs in the JRE the difference with browsers is that the rendering / input hooks are routed through browser bindings as opposed to direct control).<br />&nbsp;<br />I'm sorry it's not a real answer but you will need to do some debugging of your own and find out what is actually causing the lag. &nbsp;The easiest way I can think of is to create some logging system that you can record millisecond start and finish times of everything near the slow down. &nbsp;Compare these start and finish times (giving you an idea of how long something takes) between online and offline versions and this should give you an incite to what is actually taking longer and causing the lag.<br />&nbsp;<br />On a bit of a side note I should warn you that many people refuse to run java applets. &nbsp;There was actually a recent "smear campaign" of sorts launched by Fox and NPR that warn's computer users to never trust Java applets as they expose security vulnerabilities that can lead to identity theft. &nbsp;Although this is 100% true and has always been the case, trusting known providers of applets is ok to do. &nbsp;The problem is your average web user won't trust you, and now that the mighty media has announced "Java is bad" we will see even less people actually allowing java applets to run.<br />&nbsp;<br />My point? &nbsp;You'r going to want to ditch your online java applet idea as it severely limits your potential audience. &nbsp;Unless this is simply something you want for you and your friends you are shooting yourself in the foot proceeding down a path that we know most people won't accept and now even more will refuse. &nbsp;If it's too late or this game simply can not be converted to either HTML 5 / Javascript or stand alone Java app you will want to adapt your design to allow the user to download and run the applet offline, however many browsers even while offline will still warn the user (stopping them from playing) that the applet shouldn't be trusted.<br />&nbsp;<br />Sources:<br />&nbsp; &nbsp; <a data-cke-saved-href="http://fox8.com/2013/01/11/homeland-security-warning-to-computer-users/" href="http://fox8.com/2013/01/11/homeland-security-warning-to-computer-users/">http://fox8.com/2013/01/11/homeland-security-warning-to-computer-users/</a><br />&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;<a data-cke-saved-href="http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2013/01/11/169156325/computer-users-should-disable-java-7-due-to-security-flaw-experts-say" href="http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2013/01/11/169156325/computer-users-should-disable-java-7-due-to-security-flaw-experts-say">http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2013/01/11/169156325/computer-users-should-disable-java-7-due-to-security-flaw-experts-say</a><br />&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;<a data-cke-saved-href="http://blogs.kqed.org/newsfix/2013/01/11/experts-warn-users-to-disable-widely-used-java-software/" href="http://blogs.kqed.org/newsfix/2013/01/11/experts-warn-users-to-disable-widely-used-java-software/">http://blogs.kqed.org/newsfix/2013/01/11/experts-warn-users-to-disable-widely-used-java-software/</a><br /><br /></p></blockquote><br />Currently there is a known and not yet fixed security hole with Java applets so i wouldn't call it a smear campaign, it is very sound advice to deactivate your java browser plugins until it is fixed since hackers are exploiting it very activily at the moment(and often using legitimate sites to do so). I belive both Chrome and Firefox are blacklisting the Java plugin right now (so it is disabled by default).<br /><br />Once the bug is fixed it will be reasonably safe to reactivate it. (The same goes for all browser plugins, if a serious security hole is found you should disable the plugin until it is fixed since website security tends to be crap and you never know if the site your visiting is safe)

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