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#ActualMarkS

Posted 15 January 2013 - 04:19 PM

So my game was running around 50 FPS, but then I reworked my terrain by implimenting GeoMipMapping, and sending my entity draw calls to a frustrum check instead of just rendering all entities.

 

I'm now pushing 170 fps, and my laptops fan ramps up and gets loud.  I'm assuming this will cook the GPU after a while.

 

Is there a way to figure out how much to sleep given the FPS? I want to get it back down to 60ish fps (or some lower value).

 

I think I need to put something to rest right now that no one else has mentioned. You will NOT cook your GPU because the fan goes up! You would only cook the GPU if the fan dies. Modern GPUs (and CPUs for that matter) have built in heat profiles that adjust fan speed based on core temperature. There is a cut off point that varies by manufacturer and once the temperature passes this point, the hardware will shut down to prevent damage.

Your hardware is doing what it is supposed to and there is nothing wrong. You are wanting to limit performance based on lack of knowledge. Focus your energy on other tasks and be grateful that you can push 170 FPS on a laptop.


#1MarkS

Posted 15 January 2013 - 04:15 PM

So my game was running around 50 FPS, but then I reworked my terrain by implimenting GeoMipMapping, and sending my entity draw calls to a frustrum check instead of just rendering all entities.

 

I'm now pushing 170 fps, and my laptops fan ramps up and gets loud.  I'm assuming this will cook the GPU after a while.

 

Is there a way to figure out how much to sleep given the FPS? I want to get it back down to 60ish fps (or some lower value).

 

I think I need to put something to rest right now that no one else has mentioned. You will NOT cook your GPU because the fan goes up! You would only cook the GPU if the fan dies. Modern GPUs (and CPUs for that matter) have built in heat profiles that adjust fan speed based on core temperature. There is a cut off point that varies by manufacturer and once the temperature passes this point, the hardware will shut down to prevent damage.

Basically, your hardware is doing what it is supposed to and there is nothing wrong. You are wanting to limit performance based on lack of knowledge. Focus your energy on other tasks and be grateful that you can push 170 FPS on a laptop.


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