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#ActualAnri

Posted 19 January 2013 - 05:09 PM

Good question. There are ways to increase the originality of your game...

It all starts with you(or the project leader) where you explore what interests you and use that as a foundation. For example, the guy who came up with Zelda used to play in caves near his home when he was a child(or something like that). Mike Singleton was mad about Lord of the Rings, and made Lords of Midnight. At this stage you need forget about games altogether and go with your own influences from perhaps personal experiences and media(that is not game related).

Here was an interesting design challenge I gave myself last year(just for a laugh and without actually making the game): Design a game based on Jaws. Now, before turning to the net, I just wrote down what I liked about the film. Then, I watched the film again(luck had it that it was on at the Cinema again! Hurrah!) and wrote down just about everything that happened in the film...

From what appeared at first to be a film with little scope for a game, it turned out that there was a wealth of ideas and concepts that could be used.. To cut a long story short, I laid out the differences between the three male leads, the victims, the reactions of the locals and those from out of town, the different boats and equipment, and even the autopsy scene. I also noted my own emotions toward the film. There certainly was no lack of mechanics to make for an interesting game!

That's even before thinking about it as a computer game. The good thing about this approach is that you are not distracted by what has already been done, but exploring dreams, ideas and possibilities. Sometimes you may feel you have come up with an original design, but find another game has beaten you to the punch...well, great minds think alike! But sometimes when you play their game, you find its not quite what you were after...

Going back to the Jaws example, I found an old MS-DOS Jaws game where it was about resource management and hunting down sharks. Quite a few of the ideas I had hit upon were already implemented in that game. But then I looked at what was different and then ran with that. The DOS game felt like a shark Hunting simulator whereas the design I had come up with was a baywatch sim, C&C and Cryo adventure combo.

So my advice is not to be discouraged when finding something similar, but to see where the differences lie and focus on them and what you personally want - not what is before you.

Long winded reply, I apologise, but its an interesting question you pose and I couldn't resist! ^_^

#1Anri

Posted 19 January 2013 - 05:07 PM

Good question. There are ways to increase the originality of your game...

 

It all starts with you(or the project leader) where you explore what interests you and use that as a foundation.  For example, the guy who came up with Zelda used to play in caves near his home when he was a child(or something like that). Mike Singleton was mad about Lord of the Rings, and made Lords of Midnight.  At this stage you need forget about games altogether and go with your own influences from perhaps personal experiences and media(that is not game related).

 

Here was an interesting design challenge I gave myself last year(just for a laugh and without actually making the game): Design a game based on Jaws. Now, before turning to the net, I just wrote down what I liked about the film. Then, I watched the film again(luck had it that it was on at the Cinema again! Hurrah!) and wrote down just about everything that happened in the film...

 

From what appeared at first to be a film with little scope for a game, it turned out that there was a wealth of ideas and concepts that could be used..  To cut a long story short, I laid out the differences between the three male leads, the victims, the reactions of the locals and those from out of town, the different boats and equipment, and even the autopsy scene. I also noted my own emotions toward the film. There certainly was no lack of mechanics to make for an interesting game!

 

That's before even before thinking about it as a computer game. The good thing about this approach is that you are not distracted by what has already been done, but exploring dreams, ideas and possibilities. Sometimes you may feel you have come up with an original design, but find another game has beaten you to the punch...well, great minds think alike! But sometimes when you play their game, you find its not quite what you were after...

 

Going back to the Jaws example, I found an old MS-DOS Jaws game where it was about resource management and hunting down sharks. Quite a few of the ideas I had hit upon were already implemented in that game.  But then I looked at what was different and then ran with that. The DOS game felt like a shark Hunting simulator whereas the design I had come up with was a baywatch sim, C&C and Cryo adventure combo.

 

So my advice is not to be discouraged when finding something similar, but to see where the differences lie and focus on them and what you personally want - not what is before you.

 

Long winded reply, I apologise, but its an interesting question you pose and I couldn't resist! ^_^


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