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#Actualwintertime

Posted 19 January 2013 - 05:44 PM

I guess that "modern audience" aka "lazy people" of any ARPG/RPG/MMORPG would probably just take the most generic weapon available with the most overpowered skill as to not having to switch around and only looting the shiniest rares as picking something up seems like useless work to them (and later whining about being poor and needing free things if its an online game), which I would find sad.
Opposite to these are more oldschool people taking the effort to optimize everything, switching weapons, armors, skills constantly, picking up everything for crafting, selling, using.
When restricting inventory you actually encourage the lazy playstyle. Imagine going into a dungeon, fighting your way through and 1/10 the way in your inventory gets filled and you start puzzling around everything to make a bit extra room. Then you start killing 1 monster, looting, calculating gold per inventory square for all items you carry, dropping the least worthy, finding next monster,... and you spend 90% of your time with accounting and 10% with RPG playing. Or you could be getting into a mob, something good drops and you can only choose between getting killed while sorting out or having that item disappear from time limit for looting, which could get incredibly frustrating. I would prefer games with at least enough space to just loot everything I find in one dungeon visit or one walk from one merchant to the next.
The halfway good thing with restricted inventory is that people cannot carry around unlimited amount of potions, though I would prefer a weight limit for this over systems where you can only carry 10 potions of this one type of potion even when you dont carry any other type which you could. Also theres the issue that this seems more like a bandaid for having given too much gold to the player or making potions not expensive enough or dropping too often.
People not being able to make use of equip they have earned by playing when there is no space for it, I would not see as a good thing.
Making the inventory small to conserve on database capacity for your MMO seems reasonable at first, but could get frustrating when there are thousands of different things people need to collect for quests and you allow them only a few hundred while still needing space for equip. Also hdd have more space nowadays...
The worst thing would be a F2P game with extra tiny inventory as to make it extra frustrating so people have to buy more space with real money.

For a FPS I can see how later levels could be made more interesting when the player can for example only carry a pistol, a rifle and one other weapon and you plan for this in your leveldesign so there are enough(but not too many) replacements available at certain points when needed.

And for a trading sim, TBS or RTS it would be almost natural to want a fixed capacity on a ship/whatever for that added realism and more complex planning needs.

#1wintertime

Posted 19 January 2013 - 05:31 PM

I guess that "modern audience" aka "lazy people" of any ARPG/RPG/MMORPG would probably just take the most generic weapon available with the most overpowered skill as to not having to switch around and only looting the shiniest rares as picking something up seems like useless work to them (and later whining about being poor and needing free things if its an online game), which I would find sad.

Opposite to these are more oldschool people taking the effort to optimize everything, switching weapons, armors, skills constantly, picking up everything for crafting, selling, using.

When restricting inventory you actually encourage the lazy playstyle. Imagine going into a dungeon, fighting your way through and 1/10 the way in your inventory gets filled and you start puzzling around everything to make a bit extra room. Then you start killing 1 monster, looting, calculating gold per inventory square for all items you carry, dropping the least worthy, finding next monster,... and you spend 90% of your time with accounting and 10% with RPG playing. Or you could be getting into a mob, something good drops and you can only choose between getting killed while sorting out or having that item disappear from time limit for looting, which could get incredibly frustrating. I would prefer games with at least enough space to just loot everything I find in one dungeon visit or one walk from one merchant to the next.

The halfway good thing with restricted inventory is that people cannot carry around unlimited amount of potions, though I would prefer a weight limit for this over systems where you can only carry 10 potions of this one type of potion even when you dont carry any other type which you could. Also theres the issue that this seems more like a bandaid for having given too much gold to the player or making potions not expensive enough or dropping too often.

People not being able to make use of equip they have earned by playing when there is no space for it, I would not see as a good thing.

Making the inventory small to conserve on database capacity for your MMO seems reasonable at first, but could get frustrating when there are thousands of different things people need to collect for quests and you allow them only a few hundred while still needing space for equip. Also hdd have more space nowadays...

 

For a FPS I can see how later levels could be made more interesting when the player can for example only carry a pistol, a rifle and one other weapon and you plan for this in your leveldesign so there are enough(but not too many) replacements available at certain points when needed.

 

And for a trading sim, TBS or RTS it would be almost natural to want a fixed capacity on a ship/whatever for that added realism and more complex planning needs.


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