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#Actualtheagentd

Posted 21 January 2013 - 05:06 PM

I've read those two already. =S


These results are little interesting since they illustrate the differences in the two different approaches. In the first image the filtering is performed with HDR values, so you get similar effects to applying DOF or motion blur in HDR where bright values can dominate their local neighborhood. The second image shows quite a different result, where the darker geometry actually ends up looking “thicker” against the bright blue sky.
I do not share this conclusion at all. The darker geometry isn't getting thicker! It's always been the bright geometry that bleeds over to the neighbors! I do agree that a wider filter is needed to completely get rid of aliasing (especially temporal aliasing) but I do not think it removes the need for post-tone map resolves. To some extent, using a wide filter is just plain blurring, meaning that it only makes the problem less apparent. A high enough contrast will still reintroduce aliasing, and also dilate bright objects even more. That cannot happen no matter how high the contrast is with per sample tone mapping.

What I think is most important is temporal aliasing. Sadly I don't have a DX11 card so I can't run the test program, but from what I can see from the images, the gradient is far from linear like it should be (or well, gamma corrected or something). I'd love to see how it works under sub-pixel movement, and I think that's where resolving before tone mapping will really shine.

#2theagentd

Posted 21 January 2013 - 05:06 PM

I've read those two already. =S


These results are little interesting since they illustrate the differences in the two different approaches. In the first image the filtering is performed with HDR values, so you get similar effects to applying DOF or motion blur in HDR where bright values can dominate their local neighborhood. The second image shows quite a different result, where the darker geometry actually ends up looking “thicker” against the bright blue sky.
I do not share this conclusion at all. The darker geometry isn't getting thicker! It's always been the bright geometry that bleeds over to the neighbors! I do agree that a wider filter is needed to completely get rid of aliasing (especially temporal aliasing) but I do not think it removes the need for post-tone map resolves. To some extent, using a wide filter is just plain blurring, meaning that it only makes the problem less apparent. A high enough contrast will still reintroduce aliasing, and also dilate bright objects even more.

What I think is most important is temporal aliasing. Sadly I don't have a DX11 card so I can't run the test program, but from what I can see from the images, the gradient is far from linear like it should be (or well, gamma corrected or something). I'd love to see how it works under sub-pixel movement, and I think that's where resolving before tone mapping will really shine.

#1theagentd

Posted 21 January 2013 - 05:01 PM

I've read those two already. =S 

 

 

 

These results are little interesting since they illustrate the differences in the two different approaches. In the first image the filtering is performed with HDR values, so you get similar effects to applying DOF or motion blur in HDR where bright values can dominate their local neighborhood. The second image shows quite a different result, where the darker geometry actually ends up looking “thicker” against the bright blue sky.

I do not share this conclusion at all. The darker geometry isn't getting thicker! It's always been the bright geometry that bleeds over to the neighbors! I do agree that a wider filter is needed to completely get rid of aliasing (especially temporal aliasing) but I do not think it removes the need for post-tone map resolves. To some extent, using a wide filter is just plain blurring, meaning that it only eases makes the problem less apparent. A high enough contrast will still reintroduce aliasing, and also dilate bright objects even more. 

 

What I think is most important is temporal aliasing. Sadly I don't have a DX11 card so I can't run the test program, but from what I can see from the images, the gradient is far from linear like it should be (or well, gamma corrected or something). I'd love to see how it works under sub-pixel movement, and I think that's where resolving before tone mapping will really shine.

 


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