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#ActualCornstalks

Posted 21 January 2013 - 09:18 PM

Do these version control software set-ups offer more for projects with a single programmer that would make them more useful for a beginner to learn sooner rather than later?

I would say yes. You don't have to become a version control ninja (just the basics should be good enough at first), but simply checking in your code as you develop will allow you to rewind if you totally f*** things up and need to undo a series of changes you made because you realize it's just not working this way. Beginners do that a lot smile.png

 

But even if you don't need to rewind back to a previous state, I think it has the added benefits that a) you get to learn a tool that you'll use for the rest of your life (even if you change between git/SVN/etc. the idea of SCM stays the same), and b) it forces you to stop and think "is this something I really want to check in?" It's a kind of self-sanity check. Sometimes I've written a quick, terrible hack, and then when I went to check in my code I had to stop and think about whether or not I felt okay checking such horrible code, and decided to write a proper fix and check that in. In other words, it can help breed good habits.

 

You won't die if you don't use it. You don't need to spend a lot of time on it. But it's got a few benefits.


#1Cornstalks

Posted 21 January 2013 - 09:09 PM

Do these version control software set-ups offer more for projects with a single programmer that would make them more useful for a beginner to learn sooner rather than later?

I would say yes. You don't have to become a version control ninja (just the basics should be good enough at first), but simply checking in your code as you develop will allow you to rewind if you totally f*** things up and need to undo a series of changes you made because you realize it's just not working this way. Beginners do that a lot :)


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