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#Actualhardcoded1337

Posted 23 January 2013 - 03:28 AM

I wonder how do you guys, who work as a single (lone wolf) developers of indie games make a living of it?

 

From all of the jobs I've ever tried it turned out that game development, especially if you work alone, is one of the toughest jobs to be successful with. This is true for most of stand-alone jobs in general but for game development it even more stands out. To create some basic game and to sell it, you have to master multiple areas of game development - programming, visual art, animation, marketing and some sound engineering also. Besides these "technical and artistic" knowledges, one has to have some sense for creation of some innovative game logic which is most of the time required in heavily saturated market in order to stand out of the crowd. One must also have some sense for level design to make levels visually appealing, challenging and meaningful and one must have some sense for overall game structure in order to build it in such a way that the flow channel of the game feels just right. Besides this, a single developer is basically forced to create games that aren't really what he wants to create. For instance shooter games, RPGs, platformers and similar stuff has to be omitted due to limited resources and time, because it's even hard for teams just to finish such a game, not to mention to polish it and make it suitable for the market. Also the quality of visual art has to be on professional level, since no serious distributor/investor and after all  gamer, will take your game seriously if it looks cheesy. And at the end, if it also taken in account that development time per project is usually measured in multiple months, you can throw all that time away if game is unsuccessful on market and this isn't rarely the case.


#7hardcoded1337

Posted 23 January 2013 - 03:28 AM

I wonder how do you guys, who work as a single (lone wolf) developers of indie games make a living of it?

From all of the jobs I've ever tried it turned out that game development, especially if you work alone, is one of the toughest jobs to be successful with. This is true for most of stand-alone jobs in general but for game development it even more stands out. To create some basic game and to sell it, you have to master multiple areas of game development - programming, visual art, animation, marketing and some sound engineering also. Besides these "technical and artistic" knowledges, one has to have some sense for creation of some innovative game logic which is most of the time required in heavily saturated market in order to stand out of the crowd. One must also have some sense for level design to make levels visually appealing, challenging and meaningful and one must have some sense for overall game structure in order to build it in such a way that the flow channel of the game feels just right. Besides this, a single developer is basically forced to create games that aren't really what he wants to create. For instance shooter games, RPGs, platformers and similar stuff has to be omitted due to limited resources and time, because it's even hard for teams just to finish such a game, not to mention to polish it and make it suitable for the market. Also the quality of visual art has to be on professional level, since no serious distributor/investor and afterall, gamer, will take your game seriously if it looks cheesy. And at the end, if it also taken in account that development time per project is usually measured in multiple months, you can throw all that time away if game is unsuccessful on market and this isn't rarely the case.

#6hardcoded1337

Posted 23 January 2013 - 03:27 AM

I wonder how do you guys, who work as a single (lone wolf) developers of indie games make a living of it?

 

From all of the jobs I've ever tried it turned out that game development, especially if you work alone, is one of the toughest jobs to be successful with. This is true for most of stand-alone jobs in general but for game development it even more stands out. To create some basic game and to sell it, you have to master multiple areas of game development - programming, visual art, animation, marketing and some sound engineering also. Besides these "technical and artistic" knowledges, one has to have some sense for creation of some innovative game logic which is most of the time required in heavily saturated market in order to stand out of the crowd. One must also have some sense for level design to make levels visually appealing, challenging and meaningful and one must have some sense for overall game structure in order to build it in such a way that the flow channel of the game feels just right. Besides this, a single developer is basically forced to create games that aren't really what he wants to create. For instance shooter games, RPGs, platformers and similar stuff has to be omitted due to limited resources and time, because it's even hard for teams just to finish such a game, not to mention to polish it and make it suitable for the market. Also the quality of visual art has to be on professional level, since no serious distributor/investor and at the end, gamer, will take your game seriously if it looks cheesy. And at the end, if it also taken in account that development time per project is usually measured in multiple months, you can throw all that time away if game is unsuccessful on market and this isn't rarely the case.


#5hardcoded1337

Posted 23 January 2013 - 03:27 AM

I wonder how do you guys, who work as a single (lone wolf) developers of indie games make a living of it? From all of the jobs I've ever tried it turned out that game development, especially if you work alone, is one of the toughest jobs to be successful with. This is true for most of stand-alone jobs in general but for game development it even more stands out. To create some basic game and to sell it, you have to master multiple areas of game development - programming, visual art, animation, marketing and some sound engineering also. Besides these "technical and artistic" knowledges, one has to have some sense for creation of some innovative game logic which is most of the time required in heavily saturated market in order to stand out of the crowd. One must also have some sense for level design to make levels visually appealing, challenging and meaningful and one must have some sense for overall game structure in order to build it in such a way that the flow channel of the game feels just right. Besides this, a single developer is basically forced to create games that aren't really what he wants to create. For instance shooter games, RPGs, platformers and similar stuff has to be omitted due to limited resources and time, because it's even hard for teams just to finish such a game, not to mention to polish it and make it suitable for the market. Also the quality of visual art has to be on professional level, since no serious distributor/investor and at the end, gamer, will take your game seriously if it looks cheesy. And at the end, if it also taken in account that development time per project is usually measured in multiple months, you can throw all that time away if game is unsuccessful on market and this isn't rarely the case.


#4hardcoded1337

Posted 23 January 2013 - 03:27 AM

I wonder how do you guys, who work as a single (lone wolf) developers of indie games make a living of it?

From all of the jobs I've ever tried it turned out that game development, especially if you work alone, is one of the toughest jobs to be successful with. This is true for most of stand-alone jobs in general but for game development it even more stands out. To create some basic game and to sell it, you have to master multiple areas of game development - programming, visual art, animation, marketing and some sound engineering also. Besides these "technical and artistic" knowledges, one has to have some sense for creation of some innovative game logic which is most of the time required in heavily saturated market in order to stand out of the crowd. One must also have some sense for level design to make levels visually appealing, challenging and meaningful and one must have some sense for overall game structure in order to build it in such a way that the flow channel of the game feels just right. Besides this, a single developer is basically forced to create games that aren't really what he wants to create. For instance shooter games, RPGs, platformers and similar stuff has to be omitted due to limited resources and time, because it's even hard for teams just to finish such a game, not to mention to polish it and make it suitable for the market. Also the quality of visual art has to be on professional level, since no serious distributor/investor and at the end, gamer, will take your game seriously if it looks cheesy. And at the end, if it also taken in account that development time per project is usually measured in multiple months, you can throw all that time away if game is unsuccessful on market and this isn't rarely the case.

#3hardcoded1337

Posted 23 January 2013 - 03:26 AM

I wonder how do you guys, who work as a single (lone wolf) developers of indie games make a living of it?

From all of the jobs I've ever tried it turned out that game development, especially if you work alone, is one of the toughest jobs to be successful with. This is true for most of stand-alone jobs in general but for game development it even more stands out. To create some basic game and to sell it, you have to master multiple areas of game development - programming, visual art, animation, marketing and some sound engineering also. Besides these "technical and artistic" knowledges, one has to have some sense for creation of some innovative game logic which is most of the time required in heavily saturated market in order to stand out of the crowd. One must also have some sense for level design to make levels visually appealing, challenging and meaningful and one must have some sense for overall game structure in order to build it in such a way that the flow channel of the game feels just right. Besides this, a single developer is basically forced to create games that aren't really what he wants to create. For instance shooter games, RPGs, platformers and similar stuff has to be omitted due to limited resources and time, because it's even hard for teams just to finish such a game, not to mention to polish it and make it suitable for the market. Also the quality of visual art has to be on professional level, since no serious distributor/investor and at the end, gamer, will take your game seriously if it looks cheesy. And at the end, if it also taken in account that development time per project is usually measured in multiple months, you can throw all that time away if game is unsuccessful on market and this isn't rarely the case.

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