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#Actuallipsryme

Posted 23 January 2013 - 10:24 AM

Multiplying the reflection color with the ambient light (and ambient occlusion) does make it look good, but I guess now its intensity would depend entirely on the ambient light intensity in the scene.
I'm wondering wouldn't it make sense to use the glossiness or specular power of the material as an intensity value for this reflection color ? Basically a material that is highly glossy (let's say = 1.0f) would have strong reflection intensity and a material that is very rough (= 0.2f) would then have very low reflection intensity. Does that make sense, or would it be "physically incorrect" somehow ?
Also would I add the reflection to everything ? Or exclude it on materials like skin ? (not sure I can't remember having seen environmental reflections on human skin before in real life).
And what you said earlier about the cryengine screenshot of those sphere's that is a metallic reflection ? How is it different ? Do I just output specular and ignore diffuse completely ? You're saying the color of the spheres in that screenshot comes from the specular color ?


Here's a screen of how it looks multiplied by the ambient and ambient occlusion:
http://d.pr/i/SuZh

The reflections are very faint now. Which makes perfect sense on the ground but maybe not on the highly glossy sphere on the right.

#4lipsryme

Posted 23 January 2013 - 10:23 AM

Multiplying the reflection color with the ambient light (and ambient occlusion) does make it look good, but I guess now its intensity would depend entirely on the ambient light intensity in the scene.
I'm wondering wouldn't it make sense to use the glossiness or specular power of the material as an intensity value for this reflection color ? Basically a material that is highly glossy (let's say = 1.0f) would have strong reflection intensity and a material that is very rough (= 0.2f) would then have very low reflection intensity. Does that make sense, or would it be "physically incorrect" somehow ?
Also would I add the reflection to everything ? Or exclude it on materials like skin ? (not sure I can't remember having seen environmental reflections on human skin before in real life).
And what you said earlier about the cryengine screenshot of those sphere's that is a metallic reflection ? How is it different ? Do I just output specular and ignore diffuse completely ? You're saying the color of the spheres in that screenshot comes from the specular color ?


Here's a screen of how it looks multiplied by the ambient and ambient occlusion:
http://d.pr/i/SuZh

The reflection are very faint now. Which makes perfect sense on the ground but maybe not on the highly glossy sphere on the right.

#3lipsryme

Posted 23 January 2013 - 10:23 AM

Multiplying the reflection color with the ambient light (and ambient occlusion) does make it look good, but I guess now its intensity would depend entirely on the ambient light intensity in the scene.

I'm wondering wouldn't it make sense to use the glossiness or specular power of the material as an intensity value for this reflection color ? Basically a material that is highly glossy (let's say = 1.0f) would have strong reflection intensity and a material that is very rough (= 0.2f) would then have very low reflection intensity. Does that make sense, or would it be "physically incorrect" somehow ?

Also would I add the reflection to everything ? Or exclude it on materials like skin ? (not sure I can't remember having seen environmental reflections on human skin before in real life).

And what you said earlier about the cryengine screenshot of those sphere's that is a metallic reflection ? How is it different ? Do I just output specular and ignore diffuse completely ? You're saying the color of the spheres in that screenshot comes from the specular color ?

 

 

Here's a screen of how it looks multiplied by the ambient and ambient occlusion: 

http://d.pr/i/SuZh

 

The reflection are very faint now.


#2lipsryme

Posted 23 January 2013 - 10:16 AM

Multiplying the reflection color with the ambient light (and ambient occlusion) does make it look good, but I guess now its intensity would depend entirely on the ambient light intensity in the scene. I'm wondering wouldn't it make sense to use the glossiness or specular power of the material as an intensity value for this reflection color ? Basically a material that is highly glossy (let's say = 1.0f) would have strong reflection intensity and a material that is very rough (= 0.2f) would then have very low reflection intensity. Does that make sense, or would it be "physically incorrect" somehow ? Also would I add the reflection to everything ? Or exclude it on materials like skin ? (not sure I can't remember having seen environmental reflections on human skin before in real life).

And what you said earlier about the cryengine screenshot of those sphere's that is a metallic reflection ?

How is it different ? Do I just output specular and ignore diffuse completely ? You're saying the color of the spheres in that screenshot comes from the specular color ?


#1lipsryme

Posted 23 January 2013 - 10:13 AM

Multiplying the reflection color with the ambient light (and ambient occlusion) does make it look good, but I guess now its intensity would depend entirely on the ambient light intensity in the scene. I'm wondering wouldn't it make sense to use the glossiness or specular power of the material as an intensity value for this reflection color ?

Basically a material that is highly glossy (let's say = 1.0f) would have strong reflection intensity and a material that is very rough (= 0.2f) would then have very low reflection intensity. Does that make sense, or would it be "physically incorrect" somehow ?


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